Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Tropical Forests in the Context of Climate Change: From Drivers, Policies to REDD+ Actions and Intensity Analysis – A Review

Version 1 : Received: 14 May 2018 / Approved: 14 May 2018 / Online: 14 May 2018 (12:57:50 CEST)

How to cite: Koglo, Y.S..; Agyare, W.A.; Villamor, G.; Kokou, K..; Gaiser, T.; Sogbedji, J.M.; Neya, T.; Moussa, S. Tropical Forests in the Context of Climate Change: From Drivers, Policies to REDD+ Actions and Intensity Analysis – A Review. Preprints 2018, 2018050198 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201805.0198.v1). Koglo, Y.S..; Agyare, W.A.; Villamor, G.; Kokou, K..; Gaiser, T.; Sogbedji, J.M.; Neya, T.; Moussa, S. Tropical Forests in the Context of Climate Change: From Drivers, Policies to REDD+ Actions and Intensity Analysis – A Review. Preprints 2018, 2018050198 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201805.0198.v1).

Abstract

Accurate forest reference and emission level (FRL, FREL) with related policies and regulations are the key determinants in establishing sustainable forest ecosystem management programmes (e.g. REDD+). This fundamental is for promoting and sustaining climate smart agricultural practices in a changing climate. With the aim to deliver better knowledge to the scientific community and policy makers on regulations and existing tools for more rigorous scientific communication when it comes to FRL and FREL accountability and policies. Thus, this review investigates forest in the changing climate and policies and underlines the performance of land use transition and intensity analysis towards deforestation with some key examples and achievements (e.g. Togo). Simply put, (i) forest as break of greenhouse gas (GHGs) and ecosystem regulator, (ii) policies and REDD+ actions, (iii) potential drivers and (iv) transition and intensity analysis approach for their accountability are discussed. In sum, impressive studies, policies and regulations are under initiations and implementations regarding the role, place and evaluation of forest losses and its ecosystem functions and services. However, there are still some gaps when it comes to: the choice of the evaluation methods in the real context of a specific ecosystem as well as the firm implementations of formulating policies in developing countries. This paper concludes with some policy measures for forest sustainability, carbon enhancement and accountability.

Subject Areas

deforestation; forest degradation; forest reference level; forest reference emission level; REDD+; intensity analysis; GHG; Togo

Readers' Comments and Ratings (1)

Comment 1
Received: 19 May 2018
Commenter: Edmond Sanganyado (Click to see Publons profile: )
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: In this review, the authors analyzed the climate change policies and their implications on tropical forests, particularly in developing nations. Considering the role of forests in climate change mitigation, the review is of great significance. However, the review lacked critical engagement between the policies, recent scholarship, and the context of developing nations. I have listed below some comments the authors may want to consider.

General Comments

The introduction offered extensive information on climate change. However, the authors may want to focus on tropical forests; why they are important, what the problem is, how it is being addressed locally, nationally and internationally, why this review adds critical information on the discussion.

REDD and REDD+ are widely criticized because they ignore the role of local people in curbing deforestation. For example, REDD+ policies suggest people to give up farmland for forests and also ignores indigenous knowledge systems. The authors should critically engage the policies by identifying the recommendations made through REDD+ and evaluating their implications on the context of developing countries. Importantly, there are several studies on perceptions, impact, and challenges of REDD+ in developing nations that the authors may want to engage.

Specific Comments

Line 43-85: The authors should probably remove these two passages because they do not contribute much to the discussion on climate change and forests. A single or two sentences are probably adequate.

Line 86-88: Add reference to substantiate the claim.

Line 92-95: Vermeulen et al. (2012) reported that the global GHG emissions from agriculture and food systems was 19-29%. However, deforestation, forest degradation, and peat land degradation accounted for 12% of the GHG emissions due to agriculture and food systems. Therefore, the maximum GHG emissions contribution of deforestation is less than 3.5% and not 15-25% as suggested by the authors.

Line 100-102: What role does the authors envisage for the communities in which the forests are located? Local people live in proximity to the forests and probably have a better understanding of the forest processes.

Line 158-177: What is the role of indigenous knowledge systems in the preservation of forests?
+ Respond to this comment
Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Rate this article
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 1
Metrics 0
Leave a public comment

×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.