Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Integrated Modeling Approach for the Development of Climate-Informed, Actionable Information

Version 1 : Received: 1 May 2018 / Approved: 2 May 2018 / Online: 2 May 2018 (13:15:12 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Judi, D.R.; Rakowski, C.L.; Waichler, S.R.; Feng, Y.; Wigmosta, M.S. Integrated Modeling Approach for the Development of Climate-Informed, Actionable Information. Water 2018, 10, 775. Judi, D.R.; Rakowski, C.L.; Waichler, S.R.; Feng, Y.; Wigmosta, M.S. Integrated Modeling Approach for the Development of Climate-Informed, Actionable Information. Water 2018, 10, 775.

Journal reference: Water 2018, 10, 775
DOI: 10.3390/w10060775

Abstract

Flooding is a prevalent natural disaster with both short and long-term social, economic, and infrastructure impacts. Changes in intensity and frequency of precipitation (including rain, snow, and rain on snow) events create challenges for the planning and management of resilient infrastructure and communities. While there is general acknowledgement that new infrastructure design should account for future climate change, no clear methods or actionable information is available to community planners and designers to ensure resilient design considering an uncertain climate future. This research used climate projections to drive high-resolution hydrology and flood models to evaluate social, economic, and infrastructure resilience for the Snohomish Watershed, WA, U.S.A. The proposed model chain has been calibrated and validated. Based on the established model chain, the peaks of precipitation and streamflows were found to shift from spring and summer to earlier winter season. The nonstationarity of peak discharges was discovered with more frequent and severe flood risks projected. The peak discharges were also projected to decrease for a certain period in the near future, which might be due to the reduced rain-on-snow events. This research was expected to provide a clear method for the incorporation of climate science in flood resilience analysis and to also provide actionable information relative to the frequency and intensity of future precipitation events.

Subject Areas

climate projections; integrated modeling; flood modeling; nonstationarity

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.