Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Conservation Agriculture Effects on Soil Greenhouse Gas Fluxes: An Overview

Version 1 : Received: 9 April 2018 / Approved: 10 April 2018 / Online: 10 April 2018 (10:02:25 CEST)

How to cite: Alikhani, H.A.; Karbin, S.; Moteshare Zadeh, B. Conservation Agriculture Effects on Soil Greenhouse Gas Fluxes: An Overview. Preprints 2018, 2018040125 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201804.0125.v1). Alikhani, H.A.; Karbin, S.; Moteshare Zadeh, B. Conservation Agriculture Effects on Soil Greenhouse Gas Fluxes: An Overview. Preprints 2018, 2018040125 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201804.0125.v1).

Abstract

Conservation Agriculture (CA) alters soil properties and microbial processes compared to conventional agriculture. These changes can affect soil-atmosphere greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes. In this overview, we summarized the results of global literature and the gaps in measuring and understanding of GHG fluxes in CA systems and conventional agriculture. Some studies compared soil carbon sequestration and soil respiration in conservation agriculture and no-tillage system with conventional agriculture and the results were not consistent in all experiments. Interactions between CA pillars and soil factors such as soil moisture, temperature, texture can determine the rate of respiration rate and soil-atmosphere CO2 fluxes. The majority of studies reported larger N2O emissions in no-tillage treatment compared with conventional tillage while some other studies reported no difference between no-tillage and conventional tillage systems. In the majority of CA studies, there is lack of required information which is necessary to understand the mechanisms and processes that affect soil GHG fluxes. Determining factors like climate, amount of plant residues, soil type, crop types included in crop rotation and cover crops and duration of the study are not considered. Static chamber method was used for measuring soil-atmosphere GHG fluxes in the majority of studies. Spatial and temporal changes in GHG flux rates are high and missing part of highly episodic events by using static chamber method may result over- or under-estimation in flux balance calculation. Applying standard techniques for measuring continuous fluxes can help to calculating accurate GHG balance.

Subject Areas

conservation agriculture; soil greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes; soil tillage

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