Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Association between Cervical Spondylosis and Migraine: A Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study

Version 1 : Received: 6 February 2018 / Approved: 7 February 2018 / Online: 7 February 2018 (06:40:48 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Lin, W.-S.; Huang, T.-F.; Chuang, T.-Y.; Lin, C.-L.; Kao, C.-H. Association between Cervical Spondylosis and Migraine: A Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 587. Lin, W.-S.; Huang, T.-F.; Chuang, T.-Y.; Lin, C.-L.; Kao, C.-H. Association between Cervical Spondylosis and Migraine: A Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 587.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 587
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph15040587

Abstract

Background: Few studies have investigated the longitudinal association between cervical spondylosis (CS) and migraine by using a nationwide population-based database. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study from 2000 to 2011 identifying 27,930 cases of cervical spondylosis and 111,720 control subjects (those without cervical spondylosis) from a single database. The subjects were frequency-matched on the basis of sex, age, and diagnosis date. The non- cervical spondylosis cohort was four times the size of the cervical spondylosis cohort. To quantify the effects of cervical spondylosis on the risk of migraine, univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results: After a 10-year follow-up controlling for potential confounding factors, overall migraine incidence was higher in the cervical spondylosis cohort than in the non- cervical spondylosis cohort (5.16 and 2.09 per 1,000 people per year, respectively; crude hazard ratio = 2.48, 95% confidence interval = 2.28–2.69) with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.03 (95% confidence interval = 1.86–2.22) after accounting for sex, age, comorbidities, and medication. Individuals with myelopathy in the cervical spondylosis cohort had a 2.19 times (95% confidence interval = 1.80–2.66) higher incidence of migraine compared than did those in the non- cervical spondylosis cohort. Conclusion: Individuals with cervical spondylosis exhibited a higher risk of migraine than those without cervical spondylosis. The migraine incidence rate was even higher among individuals with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

Subject Areas

cervical spondylosis; migraine; retrospective cohort study; population-based

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