Preprint Review Version 1 This version not peer reviewed

Life Emerged from [GADV]-Protein World, but Not from RNA World!?

Version 1 : Received: 25 December 2017 / Approved: 25 December 2017 / Online: 25 December 2017 (08:08:37 CET)

How to cite: Ikehara, K. Life Emerged from [GADV]-Protein World, but Not from RNA World!?. Preprints 2017, 2017120170 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201712.0170.v1). Ikehara, K. Life Emerged from [GADV]-Protein World, but Not from RNA World!?. Preprints 2017, 2017120170 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201712.0170.v1).

Abstract

All life on Earth uses three integrated molecular systems in which genetic information contained in DNA base sequences is transmitted to ribosomes by RNA and a genetic code, then translated into the amino acid sequences of structural and catalytic proteins. Therefore, the most important point for understanding the origin of life is to determine how such systems could emerge from random processes on the early Earth. In this review, two alternatives are compared: the RNA world hypothesis and the [GADV]-protein world hypothesis. [GADV] refers to four amino acids, Gly [G], Ala [A], Asp [D] and Val [V] that are conserved in the amino acid sequences of many common proteins. Here I will argue that the origins of the three primary processes required for life to begin can be better explained by the GADV hypothesis than the RNA world hypothesis. The GADV hypothesis also incorporates a conversion process by which random polymers can evolve into proteins with ordered sequences.

Subject Areas

RNA world; [GADV]-protein world; GADV hypothesis; origin of life; protein 0th-order structure; origin of protein; origin of genetic code; origin of gene

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