Preprint Article Version 1 This version not peer reviewed

Academic Advising and Maintaining Major: Is There a Relation?

Version 1 : Received: 19 November 2017 / Approved: 19 November 2017 / Online: 19 November 2017 (12:52:35 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Jaradat, M.S.; Mustafa, M.B. Academic Advising and Maintaining Major: Is There a Relation? Soc. Sci. 2017, 6, 151. Jaradat, M.S.; Mustafa, M.B. Academic Advising and Maintaining Major: Is There a Relation? Soc. Sci. 2017, 6, 151.

Journal reference: Soc. Sci. 2017, 6, 151
DOI: 10.3390/socsci6040151

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of academic advising on changing or maintaining majors in university degrees. It is also a goal of the study to determine which semester of the course study is most likely or less likely witness the change of major and whether advising contributes to that change. Through this correlational study, the researchers explored students’ perceptions about the academic advising they received and the relationship of its absence on students’ major change. The participants were 1725 undergraduate students from all year levels. One survey is used to collect the data for this study: Influences on Choice of Major Survey. Based on the findings, it is found that university advisors have a very poor effect on students' decisions to select their majors as 45.6% of the 1725 participants indicate NO influence of advising in their survey answers. Whereas career advancement opportunities, students' interests, and job opportunities indicate a strong effect on their majors’ selections as they score the highest means of 3.76, 3.73, 3.64 respectively. In addition, findings show that students are most likely changing their majors in their second year and specifically in the second semester. Second year major change scored 36.9% in the second semester and 30.9% in the first semester. More importantly, results indicate that there is a positive significant correlation between college advisor and change major in the second year (p = 0.000). It is to researchers understanding based on the findings that when students receive enough academic advising in the first year of study and continues steadily to the next year, the possibilities of students changing their majors decreases greatly.

Subject Areas

academic advising; undergraduate students; major choice; influence, major change

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