Preprint Concept Paper Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Smartphone-Based Safety Planning and Self-Monitoring for Suicidal Patients: A Conceptual Basis for the CASPAR (Continuous Assessment for Suicide Prevention and Research) Study

Version 1 : Received: 14 April 2017 / Approved: 18 April 2017 / Online: 18 April 2017 (03:24:13 CEST)

How to cite: Nuij, C.; Van Ballegooijen, W.; Ruwaard, J.; de Beurs, D.; O'Connor, R.C.; Smit, J.H.; Riper, H.; Kerkhof, A. Smartphone-Based Safety Planning and Self-Monitoring for Suicidal Patients: A Conceptual Basis for the CASPAR (Continuous Assessment for Suicide Prevention and Research) Study. Preprints 2017, 2017040103 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201704.0103.v1). Nuij, C.; Van Ballegooijen, W.; Ruwaard, J.; de Beurs, D.; O'Connor, R.C.; Smit, J.H.; Riper, H.; Kerkhof, A. Smartphone-Based Safety Planning and Self-Monitoring for Suicidal Patients: A Conceptual Basis for the CASPAR (Continuous Assessment for Suicide Prevention and Research) Study. Preprints 2017, 2017040103 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201704.0103.v1).

Abstract

Suicidal behaviour remains difficult to predict and prevent, even for experienced mental health care professionals. The known distal risk factors for suicidal behaviour are not sufficiently specific to fully understand the complex dynamic processes that precede a suicide attempt. Real-time mobile monitoring data can be used to analyse proximal risk mechanisms within the suicidal process. At the same time smartphone-based safety planning and self-monitoring may enhance a patient’s self-management skills thereby increasing their capacity to respond to a suicidal crisis and to become more aware of crisis symptoms. The current paper describes the theoretical and conceptual rationale for the CASPAR study which applies an innovative approach to the study of suicidal processes. It uses basic science approaches to inform the implementation of an innovative suicide prevention intervention. We aim to develop and implement mobile safety plan in conjunction with real-time monitoring in order to both directly implement suicide prevention interventions and to study the ongoing dynamics of individual suicidal behaviour by applying network analysis.

Subject Areas

suicide prevention; e-mental health; implementation; fundamental research; ecological momentary assessment; experience sampling; network analysis

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