Preprint Article Version 1 This version not peer reviewed

Ethnic Differences in the Food Intake Patterns and Its Association Factors of Adolescents in Malaysia

Version 1 : Received: 4 September 2016 / Approved: 5 September 2016 / Online: 5 September 2016 (14:46:56 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Abdullah, N.-F.; Teo, P.S.; Foo, L.H. Ethnic Differences in the Food Intake Patterns and Its Associated Factors of Adolescents in Kelantan, Malaysia. Nutrients 2016, 8, 551. Abdullah, N.-F.; Teo, P.S.; Foo, L.H. Ethnic Differences in the Food Intake Patterns and Its Associated Factors of Adolescents in Kelantan, Malaysia. Nutrients 2016, 8, 551.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2016, 8, 551
DOI: 10.3390/nu8090551

Abstract

Abstract: Objective: The aim of the study was to identify dietary patterns and its association with socio-economic, dietary and lifestyle practices among adolescents in Malaysia. Methods: A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to assess dietary patterns. Results: Multivariate analyses show that age and physical activity (PA) levels were emerged as positive determinants of healthy-based food pattern in Malay (All, p<0.001), whereas higher consumption of eating-out from home (EatOut) and fast food (All, p<0.05) were negative determinants. High weekly breakfast skipping (p<0.001) and EatOut (p<0.01) were positively associated with a western-based pattern, whereas age (p<0.001) and household income (p<0.05) were negative determinants. Higher frequency of daily snacking (p<0.05) was emerged as positive determinant of local-based food pattern. For Chinese adolescents, age (p<0.001), PA levels (p<0.001) and maternal education level (p<0.05) emerged as positive determinants for the healthy-based pattern, whereas high EatOut and fast food intakes (All, p<0.01) were negative determinants. Higher weekly consumption of EatOut (p<0.01), fast food (p<0.05) and carbonated beverages (p<0.05), and daily snacking practice (p<0.01) were positively associated with higher western-based food pattern, whereas age (p<0.01) was inversely associated. Conclusion: These findings suggest that unhealthy dietary and lifestyle practices could increase the risk of adherence to unhealthy western-based food pattern that is high in fat, sugar and salt contents, and consequently increase the risk of developing obesity and metabolic-related disorders during these critical years of growth.

Subject Areas

dietary patterns, food-frequency questionnaire, dietary, lifestyle practices, adolescents

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