Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Rethinking the Agroecology-Food and Nutrition Security Nexus from A Feminist Economics Perspective

Version 1 : Received: 14 August 2022 / Approved: 16 August 2022 / Online: 16 August 2022 (03:31:35 CEST)

How to cite: Ume, C. Rethinking the Agroecology-Food and Nutrition Security Nexus from A Feminist Economics Perspective . Preprints 2022, 2022080272 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202208.0272.v1). Ume, C. Rethinking the Agroecology-Food and Nutrition Security Nexus from A Feminist Economics Perspective . Preprints 2022, 2022080272 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202208.0272.v1).

Abstract

This paper investigates how agroecology in Africa is researched for two purposes. First, we present evidence of links between agroecology and food and nutrition security in sub-Saharan Africa. Second, we investigate which pathways of influence are dominant in the existing research and which pathways are under-represented. To achieve these objectives we anchor our analysis within feminist economics, thereby making use of the concepts of social reproduction and agency in our analysis of the literature. By employing a systematic literature review of empirical studies from African countries, starting from 1996 to 2020, we consolidate evidence that agroecology has contributed to food and nutrition security by acting toward sustainability at the farm level. However, our review shows in a second step that social and household dimensions of agroecology at the level of households and territories are not well documented in research linking agroecology to food security and nutrition in sub-Saharan Africa. Given that sustainable production practices such as agroecological practices are not mutually exclusive from the social activities of farmers and cultural contexts in which farmers are embedded, it is important to consider social and ecological processes concomitantly when assessing the value of Agroecology programs.

Keywords

agroecology; physical reproduction; social reproduction; agency; sub-Saharan Africa; smallholder agriculture

Subject

SOCIAL SCIENCES, Sociology

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