Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Promoting Oncolytic Vector Replication With Switches That Detect Ubiquitous Mutations

Version 1 : Received: 10 August 2022 / Approved: 11 August 2022 / Online: 11 August 2022 (11:50:12 CEST)

How to cite: Renteln, M. Promoting Oncolytic Vector Replication With Switches That Detect Ubiquitous Mutations. Preprints 2022, 2022080220 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202208.0220.v1). Renteln, M. Promoting Oncolytic Vector Replication With Switches That Detect Ubiquitous Mutations. Preprints 2022, 2022080220 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202208.0220.v1).

Abstract

Most existing cancer therapies negatively affect normal tissue as well as cancerous tissue. A potentially effective strategy for treating cancer that precludes off-target damage and could be an option for most patients would involve targeting one or more mutations that are ubiquitous in the given patient’s tumor(s). To effect this strategy, one would employ multi-region sequencing of a patient’s primary tumor and metastases to seek out mutations that are shared between all or at least most regions. Once the target or targets are known, one would ideally rapidly generate a molecular switch for at least one of said ubiquitous mutations that can distinguish the mutated DNA, RNA, or protein from the wild-type version and subsequently trigger a therapeutic response. I propose that the therapeutic response involve the replication of an oncolytic virus or intracellular bacterium, as any mutation can theoretically be detected by a vector that enters the cell - and automatic propagation could be very helpful. Moreover, the mutation “signal” can be easily enhanced through transcriptional and translational (if the target is an intracellular protein) enhancement. Importantly, RNA may make the best target for the molecular switches in terms of amplification of the signal and ease of targeting.

Keywords

Molecular switches; oncolytic vectors; patient-specific ubiquitous mutations; targeted therapy; multi-region sequencing; molecular biology

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Oncology & Oncogenics

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