Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Alterations of Mitochondrial Network by Cigarette and e-Cigarette Vaping

Version 1 : Received: 21 April 2022 / Approved: 10 May 2022 / Online: 10 May 2022 (12:54:42 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Kanithi, M.; Junapudi, S.; Shah, S.I.; Matta Reddy, A.; Ullah, G.; Chidipi, B. Alterations of Mitochondrial Network by Cigarette Smoking and E-Cigarette Vaping. Cells 2022, 11, 1688. Kanithi, M.; Junapudi, S.; Shah, S.I.; Matta Reddy, A.; Ullah, G.; Chidipi, B. Alterations of Mitochondrial Network by Cigarette Smoking and E-Cigarette Vaping. Cells 2022, 11, 1688.

Journal reference: Cells 2022, 11, 1688
DOI: 10.3390/cells11101688

Abstract

Toxins present in cigarette and e-cigarette smoke constitute a significant cause of illnesses and are known to have fatal health impacts. Specific mechanisms by which toxins present in smoke impair cell repair are still being researched and are of prime interest for developing more effective treatments. Current literature suggests toxins present in cigarette smoke and aerosolized e-vapor trigger abnormal intercellular responses, damage mitochondrial function, and consequently disrupt the homeostasis of the organelle’s biochemical processes by increasing reactive oxidative species. Increased oxidative stress sets off a cascade of molecular events, disrupting optimal mitochondrial morphology and homeostasis. Furthermore, smoking-induced oxidative stress may also amalgamate with other health factors to contribute to various pathophysiological processes. An increasing number of studies show that toxins may affect mitochondria even though exposure to secondhand or thirdhand smoke. This review assesses the impact of toxins present in tobacco smoke and e-vapor on mitochondrial health, networking, and critical structural processes including mitochondria fission, fusion, hyperfusion, fragmentation, and mitophagy. The efforts are focused on discussing current evidence linking toxins present in first, second, and thirdhand smoke to mitochondrial dysfunction

Keywords

Cigarette smoking; e-cigarette smoking; mitochondria; fusion; fission

Subject

LIFE SCIENCES, Molecular Biology

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