Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Describing the Function, Disability, and Health of Adults With Disabilities and Older Adults During the Early Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic Restrictions

Version 1 : Received: 29 April 2022 / Approved: 5 May 2022 / Online: 5 May 2022 (12:35:32 CEST)

How to cite: Derakhshan, P.; Miller, W.C.; Borisoff, J.; Esfandiari, E.; Forwell, S.; Jarus, T.; Mohammadi, S.; Rash, I.; Sakakibara, B.; Schmidt, J.; Tao, G.; Tregobov, N.; Mortenson, W.B. Describing the Function, Disability, and Health of Adults With Disabilities and Older Adults During the Early Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic Restrictions. Preprints 2022, 2022050038 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202205.0038.v1). Derakhshan, P.; Miller, W.C.; Borisoff, J.; Esfandiari, E.; Forwell, S.; Jarus, T.; Mohammadi, S.; Rash, I.; Sakakibara, B.; Schmidt, J.; Tao, G.; Tregobov, N.; Mortenson, W.B. Describing the Function, Disability, and Health of Adults With Disabilities and Older Adults During the Early Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic Restrictions. Preprints 2022, 2022050038 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202205.0038.v1).

Abstract

Coronavirus disease 2019 restrictions impacted Canadians' daily living, especially those at higher risk of compromised health conditions. This study aimed to describe the physical, psychological, and social well-being of adults with disabilities, and older adults from May to June 2020. An online survey was used to administer standardized measures of mobility, anxiety and depression, boredom, resilience, technology readiness, social support, social networks, and participation. Seventy-two participants were recruited, with a mean age (SD) of 61.2 (13.8). 69.4% of participants had a disability, and 51.4% were older adults. 27.8% and 16.7% of participants exceeded the anxiety and depression cut-off scores, respectively. Boredom and restriction in participation were experienced by 76.4% and 80.1% of participants, respectively. Participants' mean (SD) resilience and life space scores were 72.4 (14.0) and 51.9 (24.0), respectively. Individuals with disabilities have comparatively higher mean anxiety (5.5 to 3.3), depression (4.8 to 2.9), and boredom (92.2 to 72.3) scores than those without. Individuals with a disability had lower resilience (69.9 to 78.0) and felt more life space restrictions (45.4 to 67.6). Our findings revealed issues with anxiety, boredom, participation, and life space activity. This information may provide supporting evidence when creating policies to mitigate existent health and social inequities.

Keywords

COVID-19; spinal cord injury; disability; stroke; well-being; social isolation

Subject

SOCIAL SCIENCES, Other

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