Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Is There Any Importance of Brain Tomography and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging in COVID-19 Patients?

Version 1 : Received: 28 April 2022 / Approved: 30 April 2022 / Online: 30 April 2022 (08:21:41 CEST)

How to cite: Türkdoğan, F.T.; Coskun, A. Is There Any Importance of Brain Tomography and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging in COVID-19 Patients?. Preprints 2022, 2022040313 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202204.0313.v1). Türkdoğan, F.T.; Coskun, A. Is There Any Importance of Brain Tomography and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging in COVID-19 Patients?. Preprints 2022, 2022040313 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202204.0313.v1).

Abstract

Background: As coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to pose a threat to the entire world, it is critical to developing strategies for containing its spread. The purpose of this study was to assess the demographic characteristics, brain tomography characteristics, and diffusion magnetic resonance findings of COVID-19 positive individuals. Material and Method: Between January 1 and December 31, 2021, 317 patients over the age of 18 were admitted to the emergency department with symptoms consistent with COVID-19. Three groups were formed based on clinical findings in patients, divided into light, medium, and severe, and four groups were formed based on radiological imaging findings. Results: The mean age of the 317 patients included in the study was 67.28±12.06 years, with a range of 28-91 years. The clinical classification of the patients was based on laboratory parameters and radiological imaging, not on their age or gender. Mild cases were classified as CO-RADS 0-4; moderate and severe cases were classified as CO-RADS 5-6 (p=0.001). While 60 (18.9%) of patients were followed outpatient, 144 (45.4%) were admitted to the hospital, 73 (23%) were admitted to the intensive care unit, and 40 (12.7%) died (p=0.001). Direct radiographs revealed bilateral involvement in 224 (70.7%) cases, peripheral involvement in 259 (81.7%) cases, and mid-lower lobe lung involvement in 194 (61.2%) cases (p=0.001). Brain tomography revealed infarction in 42 (13.2%) of the patients who were followed and hospitalized and hemorrhage in 22 (6.9%) of the patients. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffusion involvement in 68 (21.5%) of the cases (p=0.001). Conclusion: A standardized reporting system for COVID-19 data is required, and it must be simple to use, quick to understand, and focused on determining the risk of pneumonia. Additionally, the diagnostic role of radiological imaging, prognosis prediction, and severity scoring of lung involvement should be included.

Keywords

Emergency department; COVID-19; lung radiography; computed tomography; diffusion magnetic resonance

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, General Medical Research

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