Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Application of Two Field Methods for Monitoring Microbiological Water Quality in a Polluted Tropical Environment - A Pilot Study

Version 1 : Received: 15 April 2022 / Approved: 29 April 2022 / Online: 29 April 2022 (08:23:45 CEST)

How to cite: Taube, F.; Cerenius, F.; Faksvåg, K.K.; Limo, H.; Khorram-Manesh, A. Application of Two Field Methods for Monitoring Microbiological Water Quality in a Polluted Tropical Environment - A Pilot Study. Preprints 2022, 2022040293 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202204.0293.v1). Taube, F.; Cerenius, F.; Faksvåg, K.K.; Limo, H.; Khorram-Manesh, A. Application of Two Field Methods for Monitoring Microbiological Water Quality in a Polluted Tropical Environment - A Pilot Study. Preprints 2022, 2022040293 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202204.0293.v1).

Abstract

(1) Background: Emergencies confront civilian and military healthcare providers with medical and hygienic challenges due to the lack of potable water. This pilot study aimed to describe the application of two different methods for microbiological monitoring of water in a harsh environment in terms of performance, ease of use, availability, and the possibility of using the results to evaluate water quality. (2) Methods: Samples from raw water, Potable water, and water for consumers were taken from two different camps with the same raw water source. The samples were analyzed by using IDEXX industry-standard methods (Colilert and Enterolert enzymatic test kits) and a combination of membrane filtration and 3M-Petrifilm. (3) Results: The IDEXX method used at the Norwegian Camp are easier to utilize and has a broader range of analyzing kits for drinking water analysis. In addition, IDEXX is better adapted to the requirements of the national legislation. However, the combination of membrane filtration followed by incubation on 3M-Petrifilm ™, as used at the Swedish camp, is a better field alternative compared to traditional bacteriology, as it eliminates the need to produce and store agar plates. (4) Conclusions: This pilot study highlights the need for adapted technical equipment and tools for internal microbiological control of water production in a harsh field environment and may facilitate the use of a relatively simple method for water control and ensure the safety of deployed staff in both civilian and military settings.

Keywords

Austere; Healthcare; Microbiological; Military; Safety; Water

Subject

LIFE SCIENCES, Microbiology

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