Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Executive Function-Related Improvements on a Commercial CBT-Based Weight Management Intervention: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

Version 1 : Received: 20 April 2022 / Approved: 26 April 2022 / Online: 26 April 2022 (12:34:42 CEST)

How to cite: Michaelides, A.; Mitchell, E.S.; Behr, H.; Ho, A.S.; Hanada, G.; Lee, J.; McPartland, S. Executive Function-Related Improvements on a Commercial CBT-Based Weight Management Intervention: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial. Preprints 2022, 2022040242 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202204.0242.v1). Michaelides, A.; Mitchell, E.S.; Behr, H.; Ho, A.S.; Hanada, G.; Lee, J.; McPartland, S. Executive Function-Related Improvements on a Commercial CBT-Based Weight Management Intervention: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial. Preprints 2022, 2022040242 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202204.0242.v1).

Abstract

Executive functioning is a key component involved in many of the processes necessary for effective weight management behavior change (e.g., setting goals). Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and third-wave CBT (e.g., mindfulness) are considered first-line treatments for obesity, but it is unknown to what extent they can improve or sustain executive functioning. This pilot randomized controlled trial examined if a CBT-based generalized weight management intervention would affect executive functioning and executive function-related brain activity in individuals with obesity or overweight. Participants were randomized to an intervention condition (N=24) that received the Noom Weight program or to a control group (N=26) receiving weekly educational newsletters. EEG measurements were taken during Flanker, Stroop, and N-back tasks at baseline and months 1 through 4. After 4 months, the intervention condition evidenced greater accuracy over time and, to some extent, neural markers of executive function (error-related negativity and beta and gamma band powers) compared to the control group on the Flanker and Stroop tasks. The intervention condition also lost more weight than controls (-7.1 pounds vs. +1.0 pounds). Given mixed evidence on whether CBT-based interventions can change markers of executive function, this study contributes preliminary evidence that a multicomponent CBT-based weight management intervention (i.e., that provide both support for weight management and is based on CBT) can help individuals sustain executive function compared to controls.

Keywords

CBT; obesity; mobile health; executive function; EEG

Subject

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, Other

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