Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Nanofiber Cellulose Grafted with Lauric Acid as a New Phase Change Material (PCM) used in Buildings for Thermal Energy Storage

Version 1 : Received: 14 April 2022 / Approved: 15 April 2022 / Online: 15 April 2022 (14:55:52 CEST)

How to cite: Zormati, S.; Aloulou, F.; Sammouda, H. Nanofiber Cellulose Grafted with Lauric Acid as a New Phase Change Material (PCM) used in Buildings for Thermal Energy Storage. Preprints 2022, 2022040148 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202204.0148.v1). Zormati, S.; Aloulou, F.; Sammouda, H. Nanofiber Cellulose Grafted with Lauric Acid as a New Phase Change Material (PCM) used in Buildings for Thermal Energy Storage. Preprints 2022, 2022040148 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202204.0148.v1).

Abstract

In this research, Cellulose Nanofibers (NFC) modified with a eutectic of lauric acid (LA) was prepared as a new form-stable phase change material (NFC-LA). Thermal properties of this composite were investigated by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The results revealed that the melting temperature and latent heat of NFC/LA were 21.56 °C and 88.5 J/g, respectively; and the super cooling degree for the NFC-LA composite decreased to 13.99 °C when compared to 20.28 °C of the pure lauric acid. Natural clay was purified and modified with Cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) to prepare organoclay. Through FTIR spectra, we have confirmed that the clay was successfully modified. The PCM-composite was then added to the organoclay to obtain a new composite denoted NFC-LA-OC. this latter was added to cement and was investigated as a reinforcement material in cement mortars for thermal energy storage application. The prepared material can both solve the leakage problem associated to the phase change material, and reduce or even avoid the use of heating and air conditioning systems, which are energy-intensive systems, and therefore reduce energy consumption.

Keywords

Cellulose Nanofiber; Organoclay; PCM; Thermal Energy Storage; Building; Composite materials

Subject

MATERIALS SCIENCE, Biomaterials

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