Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Antimicrobial Prescribing Confidence and Knowledge Regarding Drug Resistance: Perception of Medical Students in Malaysia and the Implications

Version 1 : Received: 15 March 2022 / Approved: 16 March 2022 / Online: 16 March 2022 (14:44:53 CET)

How to cite: Haque, M.; Ara, T.; Haq, M.A.; Lugova, H.; Dutta, S.; Samad, N.; Rabiu Abubakar, A.; Syed Mohdhar, S.S.B.; Rahman, M.M.; Islam, S.; Adnan, N.; Ahmad, R.; Binti Abdullah, S.L.; Ismail, M.H.B.; Godman, B. Antimicrobial Prescribing Confidence and Knowledge Regarding Drug Resistance: Perception of Medical Students in Malaysia and the Implications. Preprints 2022, 2022030235 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202203.0235.v1). Haque, M.; Ara, T.; Haq, M.A.; Lugova, H.; Dutta, S.; Samad, N.; Rabiu Abubakar, A.; Syed Mohdhar, S.S.B.; Rahman, M.M.; Islam, S.; Adnan, N.; Ahmad, R.; Binti Abdullah, S.L.; Ismail, M.H.B.; Godman, B. Antimicrobial Prescribing Confidence and Knowledge Regarding Drug Resistance: Perception of Medical Students in Malaysia and the Implications. Preprints 2022, 2022030235 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202203.0235.v1).

Abstract

Background: Worldwide, microbes are becoming more dangerous by acquiring virulent skills to adapt and develop antimicrobial resistance (AMR). This is a concern as this increases morbidity, mortality, and costs. Consequently, physicians need to be trained inappropriate prescribing, starting with medical students. Objective: Evaluate medical students' confidence in antimicrobial agent prescribing and drug resistance Methods: Cross-sectional study assessing medical students' knowledge, perception, and confidence in prescribing antimicrobial agents and drug resistance in a Malaysian University. A universal sampling method was used. Results: Most respondents believe that educational input regarding overall prescribing was sufficient. Regarding the principle of appropriate and accurate prescriptions, female medical students had less knowledge [Odds Ratio (OR)=0.51; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.25-0.99; p=0.050]. Year-IV and Year-V students had more excellent knowledge than Year-III students regarding confidence in antibiotic prescribing. Year-V students also showed appreciably higher confidence in the broad principles of prescribing, including infectious diseases, compared to those in other years. Conclusion: Overall, medical students, gain more excellent knowledge and confidence regarding prescribing, including antimicrobials, as their academic careers progress.

Keywords

Antimicrobial; Prescribing; Drug Resistance; Knowledge; Perception; Medical Students; Malaysia

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Pharmacology & Toxicology

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