Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

A Pilot Study on the Prevalence of Micronutrient Imbalances in a Dutch General Population Cohort and the Effects of a Digital Lifestyle Program

Version 1 : Received: 8 March 2022 / Approved: 10 March 2022 / Online: 10 March 2022 (14:11:38 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Castela Forte, J.; Gannamani, R.; Folkertsma, P.; Kanthappu, S.; van Dam, S.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R. A Pilot Study on the Prevalence of Micronutrient Imbalances in a Dutch General Population Cohort and the Effects of a Digital Lifestyle Program. Nutrients 2022, 14, 1426. Castela Forte, J.; Gannamani, R.; Folkertsma, P.; Kanthappu, S.; van Dam, S.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R. A Pilot Study on the Prevalence of Micronutrient Imbalances in a Dutch General Population Cohort and the Effects of a Digital Lifestyle Program. Nutrients 2022, 14, 1426.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2022, 14, 1426
DOI: 10.3390/nu14071426

Abstract

Maintaining an adequate micronutrient status can be achieved by following a complete, diverse diet. Yet, food trends in Western countries show suboptimal consumption of healthy nutrients. In this study we explored the prevalence of vitamin and mineral imbalances in a general population cohort of Dutch adults, and evaluated the effect of a digital lifestyle program on the nutritional status and nutrition health behaviors of these individuals. A micronutrient panel was measured in 348 participants, alongside a dietary assessment. One-hundred users subsequently underwent a remeasurement. We identified at least one nutritional imbalance in 301 individuals (86.5%). 80% improved and normalized B6, 67% improved folate, 70% improved B12, and 86% improved vitamin D. Iron abnormalities were corrected in 75% of participants. In conclusion, this study found micronutrient deficiencies of easily obtainable vitamins through diet or supplementation such as B vitamins and vitamin D were more prevalent than expected in a Dutch population. This can partly be explained by an insufficient consumption of food groups rich in B vita-mins. Our preliminary results in those remeasured after a digitally-enabled lifestyle intervention show these imbalances can be corrected with adequate behavioral support in a “food as medicine” approach complemented with supplementation where needed.

Keywords

vitamins; micronutrients; deficiencies; screening; general population; lifestyle; prevention; vitamin d; vitamin b12

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Nutrition

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