Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

A Mixed Methods Investigation of LGBTQ+ Victimization, Its Relationship to LGBTQ+ Identity Development, and the Buffering Potential of Social Support and Outness

Version 1 : Received: 23 February 2022 / Approved: 9 March 2022 / Online: 9 March 2022 (02:27:55 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Kiperman, S.; Schacter, H.L.; Judge, M.; DeLong, G. LGBTQ+ Youth’s Identity Development in the Context of Peer Victimization: A Mixed Methods Investigation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 3921. Kiperman, S.; Schacter, H.L.; Judge, M.; DeLong, G. LGBTQ+ Youth’s Identity Development in the Context of Peer Victimization: A Mixed Methods Investigation. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 3921.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 3921
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph19073921

Abstract

Research rarely explores LGBTQ+ youth bullying in the context of culture-specific outcomes (e.g., LGBTQ+ identity development) and what can mitigate the impact of peer stressors. This study used a concurrent mixed methods design to explore how experiences of peer victimization predicted LGBTQ+ youth’s identity development (i.e., stigma sensitivity, concealment motivation, and difficult process) and whether social support and outness served as protective, moderating factors. The mixed-methods approach provides a culture-specific context via qualitative inquiry to inform whether the quantitative findings align with how youth qualitatively discuss their experience of bullying, negative outcomes, and social support. Our sample consisted of 349 LGBTQ+ youth 14-17 years old who completed a survey (quantitative sample), and a subset of 39 LGBTQ+ youth who completed a semi-structured interview (qualitative sample). Our quantitative findings indicated that greater overall peer victimization was positively related to LGBIS-revised subscales of stigma sensitivity, concealment motivation, and difficult process, where both outness and social support moderated such relations. Qualitatively, victimized youth also reported stigma sensitivity and concealment motivation, while also endorsing how being out and having a support system played a role in their experience of being victimized. These qualitative findings align with our quantitative findings that classmate support mitigated the effects of peer victimization on difficulty of coming out. Implications for practitioners and researchers are provided.

Keywords

LGBTQ+ youth; peer victimization; identity development; social support; outness; mixed methods

Subject

SOCIAL SCIENCES, Other

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