Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Bioprocesses and Technologies for Nutrient Recovery From Waste Water: Microalgae and Jellyfish

Version 1 : Received: 31 December 2021 / Approved: 14 January 2022 / Online: 14 January 2022 (11:18:16 CET)

How to cite: Muthoni, F.V.; Veiga, M.; Kennes, C. Bioprocesses and Technologies for Nutrient Recovery From Waste Water: Microalgae and Jellyfish. Preprints 2022, 2022010201 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0201.v1). Muthoni, F.V.; Veiga, M.; Kennes, C. Bioprocesses and Technologies for Nutrient Recovery From Waste Water: Microalgae and Jellyfish. Preprints 2022, 2022010201 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0201.v1).

Abstract

The introduction of organic and inorganic substances to the environment is a result of human activities such as agriculture, domestic and industrial wastewater which leads to pollution. Treatment processes of these wastewaters are being conducted globally to eliminate easily settled materials and recover nutrients in an attempt to release clear and apparently clean effluent into natural waters. Lack of removing inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients is the greatest cause of eutrophication in water bodies which inhibits the life of other organisms as well as pose a threat to human life and loss of the economy. Different technologies have been applied and are being developed to recover nutrients as well as heavy metals from wastewater to meet the permissible limits before discharging effluents. Wastewater treatment using microalgae offers an opportunity to provide tertiary bio-treatment and production of valuable biomass. Microalgae use the available inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus for their growth which are then harvested for various uses. Additionally, they have the ability to remove heavy metals and some toxic compounds. The main specific microalgae species in this study is the Chlorella sorokiniana with the Aequorea victoria jellyfish This paper reviews some of the wastewater treatment processes and focus on the use of microalgae and some of the shortcomings of the technologies and how they can be improved to achieve maximum nutrient recovery economically with low energy demand.

Keywords

wastewater; valuable algal biomass; nitrogen; phosphorus; jellyfish

Subject

EARTH SCIENCES, Environmental Sciences

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