Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Residential Mobility of a Cohort of Homeless People in Times of Crisis: COVID-19 Pandemic in an European Metropolis

Version 1 : Received: 5 January 2022 / Approved: 11 January 2022 / Online: 11 January 2022 (17:20:14 CET)

How to cite: Allibert, A.; Tinland, A.; Landier, J.; Loubière, S.; Gaudart, J.; Mosnier, M.; Farnarier, C.; Auquier, P.; Mosnier, E. Residential Mobility of a Cohort of Homeless People in Times of Crisis: COVID-19 Pandemic in an European Metropolis. Preprints 2022, 2022010152 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0152.v1). Allibert, A.; Tinland, A.; Landier, J.; Loubière, S.; Gaudart, J.; Mosnier, M.; Farnarier, C.; Auquier, P.; Mosnier, E. Residential Mobility of a Cohort of Homeless People in Times of Crisis: COVID-19 Pandemic in an European Metropolis. Preprints 2022, 2022010152 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0152.v1).

Abstract

Most vulnerable individuals are particularly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. This study takes place in a large city in France. The aim of this study is to describe the mobility of the homeless population at the begin-ning of the health crisis and to analyze its impact in terms of COVID-19 prevalence. From June to August 2020 and September to December 2020, 1272 homeless people were invited to be tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and virus in and completed questionnaires. Our data show that homeless populations are sociologically dif-ferent depending on where they live. We show that people living on the street were most likely to be relocated to emergency shelters than other inhabitants. Some neighborhoods are points of attraction for homeless peo-ple in the city while others emptied during the health crisis, which had consequences for virus circulation. People with a greater number of different dwellings reported became more infected. This first study of the mo-bility and epidemiology of homeless people in time of pandemic provides unique information about mobility mapping, sociological factors of this mobility, mobility at different scales and epidemiological consequences. We suggest that homeless policies need to be radically transformed since actual model exposes people to infection in emergency.

Keywords

SARS-CoV2; COVID-19; homeless people; public health; vulnerable population; Seroprevalence, cohort; residential mobility

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Other

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