Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The differences between the Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale and the Brief Resilience Scale When Assessing Resilience: Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Predictive Effects

Version 1 : Received: 30 December 2021 / Approved: 4 January 2022 / Online: 4 January 2022 (12:34:37 CET)

How to cite: Ye, Y.; Wu, C.; Yang, C. The differences between the Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale and the Brief Resilience Scale When Assessing Resilience: Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Predictive Effects. Preprints 2022, 2022010006 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0006.v1). Ye, Y.; Wu, C.; Yang, C. The differences between the Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale and the Brief Resilience Scale When Assessing Resilience: Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Predictive Effects. Preprints 2022, 2022010006 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0006.v1).

Abstract

The Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) and the Brief Resilience Scale (BRS) are two widely used scales to measure resilience. Although both scales seek to assess an individual’s ability to recover from and adapt to disruptions or stressful events, they may capture different aspects of resilience. While the CD-RISC focuses on resources that can help individuals recover from and adapt to disruptions or stressful events, the BRS directly measures one’s ability to bounce back or be resilient. The aim of this study is to empirically examine the differences between the CD-RISC and the BRS. Two samples (n = 202, 246) consisting of undergraduate students from Taiwan were used. The results of confirmatory factor analysis show that the CD-RISC and the BRS are highly correlated but still distinct. The results of regression analyses show that the CD-RISC and the BRS have unique predictive effects on depression and life satisfaction. The research findings suggest that the CD-RISC and the BRS capture different aspects of resilience. For future research on resilience, researchers should pay attention to the differences between these scales and choose the one that most closely fits their research purpose.

Keywords

resilience; Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale; Brief Resilience Scale; depression; life satisfaction; confirmatory factor analysis

Subject

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, Social Psychology

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