Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

How Does Contraceptive Use Affect Women’s Sexuality? A Novel Look at Sexual Acceptability

Version 1 : Received: 14 December 2021 / Approved: 15 December 2021 / Online: 15 December 2021 (11:17:31 CET)

How to cite: Caruso, S.; Palermo, G.; Caruso, G.; Rapisarda, A.M.C. How Does Contraceptive Use Affect Women’s Sexuality? A Novel Look at Sexual Acceptability. Preprints 2021, 2021120255 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202112.0255.v1). Caruso, S.; Palermo, G.; Caruso, G.; Rapisarda, A.M.C. How Does Contraceptive Use Affect Women’s Sexuality? A Novel Look at Sexual Acceptability. Preprints 2021, 2021120255 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202112.0255.v1).

Abstract

Among the components of a healthy life, sexuality is an essential part, contributing not only to psychophysical well-being, but also to the social well-being of women and, consequently to their quality of life. A poorly investigated standpoint is the acceptability of a contraceptive method, not only in terms of tolerability and metabolic neutrality, but also concerning the impact that it can have on sexual life. In this context, we will provide an overview of the different methods of contraception and their effects on female sexuality from the biological changes, to organic, social, and psychological factors, which can all shape sexuality.A MEDLINE/PUBMED review of the literature between 2010 and 2021 was conducted using the following key words/phrases: hormonal contraception, contraceptives, female sexual function, libido, sexual arousal and desire, and sexual pain. Recent studies have supported the effects of contraceptives on women’s sexuality, describing a variety of positive and negative events on several domains of the sexual function (desire, arous-al, orgasm, pain, enjoyment). However, satisfaction with sexual activity depends on factors that extend beyond sexual functioning alone. A more holistic approach is needed to better under-stand the multitude of factors linked to women’s sexuality and contraception. Contraceptive counselling must necessarily consider these important elements since they are closely related to good compliance.

Keywords

Hormonal contraception; Long acting reversible contraceptives; Quality of life; Short acting reversible contraceptives; Sexual arousal and desire; Sexual behavior

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Obstetrics & Gynaecology

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