Preprint Article Version 2 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Comparison of Infrared Thermal Imaging with Two Canine Pain Assessment Tools in Dogs Undergoing Treatment for Chronic Back Pain

Version 1 : Received: 19 November 2021 / Approved: 1 December 2021 / Online: 1 December 2021 (11:25:21 CET)
Version 2 : Received: 17 December 2021 / Approved: 17 December 2021 / Online: 17 December 2021 (14:32:16 CET)

How to cite: Freeman, E.; Johnson, J.F.; Godbold, Jr, J.C.; Riegel, R.J. Comparison of Infrared Thermal Imaging with Two Canine Pain Assessment Tools in Dogs Undergoing Treatment for Chronic Back Pain. Preprints 2021, 2021120010 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202112.0010.v2). Freeman, E.; Johnson, J.F.; Godbold, Jr, J.C.; Riegel, R.J. Comparison of Infrared Thermal Imaging with Two Canine Pain Assessment Tools in Dogs Undergoing Treatment for Chronic Back Pain. Preprints 2021, 2021120010 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202112.0010.v2).

Abstract

Historically, the evaluation and assessment of the clinical response to treatment for canine back pain is subjective and relies on owner and clinician assessment of pain. This study evaluated the use of sequential infrared thermal images as a measure of the response of canine patients with back pain to a prescribed series of photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) treatments. Qualifying participants had histories of pain and dysfunction associated with spinal osteoarthritis or intervertebral disk disease, or of non-specific uni- or bilateral back pain along the paravertebral epaxial muscles. Each patient was initially thermally imaged prior to PBMT treatment and then received multiple PBMT treatments delivered to the appropriate spinal area on days 1, 2, 3, and 4. Participants were reimaged on day 7. Thermal images provided an objective measure of superficial temperature changes over the area of PBMT treatment of each patient after the PBMT regimen. The temperature correlated with statistically significant changes in Colorado State University Canine Chronic Pain Scale scoring (CPS) and owner assessment using the Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI), which includes a Pain Severity Score (PSS) and Pain Interference Score (PIS). The correlation of objective thermal imaging data with more subjective outcome measures suggests thermal imaging may be a valuable additional tool in monitoring therapy outcome.

Keywords

infrared thermal imaging; infrared thermography; veterinary thermal imaging; pain assessment; osteoarthritis; canine back pain; canine brief pain inventory; photobiomodulation therapy; laser therapy

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Veterinary Medicine

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 17 December 2021
Commenter: Jennifer Johnson
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: Please accept this updated version which was completed after peer-review comments and has been resubmitted for publication
+ Respond to this comment

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 1
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.