Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Public Responses to Airborne Wind Energy: A Literature Review

Version 1 : Received: 4 November 2021 / Approved: 5 November 2021 / Online: 5 November 2021 (12:21:18 CET)

How to cite: Schmidt, H.; de Vries, G.; Renes, R.J.; Schmehl, R. Public Responses to Airborne Wind Energy: A Literature Review. Preprints 2021, 2021110120 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202111.0120.v1). Schmidt, H.; de Vries, G.; Renes, R.J.; Schmehl, R. Public Responses to Airborne Wind Energy: A Literature Review. Preprints 2021, 2021110120 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202111.0120.v1).

Abstract

Airborne wind energy (AWE) systems use tethered flying devices to harvest higher-altitude winds to produce electricity. For a successful deployment of these systems, it is crucial to understand how the public perceives them. If public concerns about the technology are not taken seriously, implementation could be delayed or, in some cases, prevented, resulting in increased costs for project developers and a lower contribution of the sector to renewable energy targets. This literature review assessed the current state of knowledge on public responses to AWE. An exhaustive literature search led to the identification of 40 relevant publications that were reviewed. The literature assumed that the safety, visibility, acoustic emissions, ecological impacts, and the siting of AWE systems shape public responses to the technology. The reviewed literature views people’s responses to AWE very optimistically but lacks scientific evidence to back up its claims. It seems to overlook that the influence of AWE’s characteristics (e.g., visibility) on public responses will also depend on a range of situational and psychological factors (e.g., people’s general attitude towards AWE, the public’s trust in project developers). Therefore, empirical social scientific research is needed to increase the field’s understanding of public responses to AWE and thereby facilitate deployment.

Keywords

airborne wind energy; renewable energy; public response; perception; acceptance; acceptability; opposition

Subject

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, Social Psychology

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