Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Microbes in the Datura Rootzone Contribute to an Antioxidant Support System of Flavonoids and Other Aromatic Compounds

Version 1 : Received: 31 October 2021 / Approved: 3 November 2021 / Online: 3 November 2021 (09:19:12 CET)

How to cite: Senn, S.; Pangell, K.; Bowerman, A.L. Microbes in the Datura Rootzone Contribute to an Antioxidant Support System of Flavonoids and Other Aromatic Compounds. Preprints 2021, 2021110076 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202111.0076.v1). Senn, S.; Pangell, K.; Bowerman, A.L. Microbes in the Datura Rootzone Contribute to an Antioxidant Support System of Flavonoids and Other Aromatic Compounds. Preprints 2021, 2021110076 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202111.0076.v1).

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the roles that microbes may be playing in the rootzone of the medicinal plant Datura inoxia. We hypothesized that rhizospheric and endophytic microbes would be found that were capable of performing the same secondary metabolic functions of the plant rootzone they inhabited. We also hypothesized that the microbial functions would be co-operative with and supportive to plant secondary metabolite production, for example, by providing precursors to important plant bioactive molecules. The methods employed were mi-crobial barcoding, tests of essential oils against antibiotic resistant bacteria and other soil bacterial isolates, 16S Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) metabarcoding, and Whole Genome Shotgun (WGS) taxonomic and functional. A few of the main bacterial genera of interest that were dis-covered in the Datura root microbiome were Flavobacterium, Chitinophaga, Pseudomonas, Strepto-myces, Rhizobium, and Bacillus. In the context of known interactions, and current results, plants and microbes influence the flavonoid biosynthetic pathways of one other, in terms of the regulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway. This is important because these compounds are phyto-protective antioxidants and are precursors to many aromatic bioactive compounds that are relevant to human health. There was strong evidence to support the notion that synergistic production of plant de-rived secondary metabolites by microbes occurred, as well as the ability for the compounds to enter plant cells. There are possible biopharmaceutical and agricultural applications of the natural interplay that was discovered during this study of the Datura inoxia rhizosphere.

Keywords

Weed science; Plant-microbe interactions; Medicinal plants; shotgun metagenomics; soil metabarcoding

Subject

BIOLOGY, Agricultural Sciences & Agronomy

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.