Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

COVID-19 Limitations on Doodling as a Measure of Burnout

Version 1 : Received: 1 November 2021 / Approved: 3 November 2021 / Online: 3 November 2021 (08:03:22 CET)

How to cite: Nash, C. COVID-19 Limitations on Doodling as a Measure of Burnout. Preprints 2021, 2021110059 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202111.0059.v1). Nash, C. COVID-19 Limitations on Doodling as a Measure of Burnout. Preprints 2021, 2021110059 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202111.0059.v1).

Abstract

Pre-COVID-19, doodling was identified as a measure of burnout in researchers attending a weekly, in-person health narratives research group manifesting team mindfulness. Under the group’s supportive conditions, variations in doodling served to measure change in participants’ reported depression and anxiety—internal states directly associated with burnout, adversely affecting healthcare researchers, their employment, and their research. COVID-19 demanded social distancing during the group’s 2020/21 academic meetings. Conducted online, the group’s participants who chose to doodle did so alone during the pandemic. Whether the sequestering of group participants during COVID-19 altered the ability of doodling to act as a measure of depression and anxiety was investigated. Participants considered doodling during the group’s online meetings increased their enjoyment and attention level—some expressed it helped them to relax. However, unlike face-to-face meetings during previous non-COVID-19 years, solitary doodling during online meetings was unable to reflect researchers’ depression or anxiety. COVID-19 limitations necessitating doodling alone maintained the benefits group members saw in doodling but hampered the ability of doodling to act as a measure of burnout in contrast to previous in-person doodling. This result is seen to correspond to one aspect of the group’s change in team mindfulness resulting from COVID-19 constraints.

Keywords

COVID-19; Burnout; Doodling; Team Mindfulness; Anxiety; Depression

Subject

SOCIAL SCIENCES, Other

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