Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Role of Probiotic Supplementation on Insulin Resistance in Obesity-Associated Diabetes: A Mini-Review

Version 1 : Received: 7 October 2021 / Approved: 8 October 2021 / Online: 8 October 2021 (10:52:45 CEST)

How to cite: Saha, S.; Alam, N.N.; Rahman, S.M.N. The Role of Probiotic Supplementation on Insulin Resistance in Obesity-Associated Diabetes: A Mini-Review. Preprints 2021, 2021100134 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202110.0134.v1). Saha, S.; Alam, N.N.; Rahman, S.M.N. The Role of Probiotic Supplementation on Insulin Resistance in Obesity-Associated Diabetes: A Mini-Review. Preprints 2021, 2021100134 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202110.0134.v1).

Abstract

Background: Obesity and diabetes are two metabolic disorders linked by an inflammatory process named insulin resistance (IR). Various research on the role of gut microbiota in developing obesity and its associated disorders has led to the growing interest in probiotic supplementation. Considering the life-threatening complications of diabesity this mini-review explored the effects of probiotic supplementation on IR in obesity-associated diabetes. Method: This review is based on recent articles from 2005-2020, studying the role of probiotic supplementation on glucose and insulin parameters in healthy and diabetic mouse models. Result: Probiotic supplementation altered the gut microbiota composition, increased short-chain fatty acid production, and decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, they decreased intestinal permeability, circulating lipopolysaccharide, and metabolic endotoxemia hence improved insulin sensitivity and reduced obesity. Although multi-strain probiotic supplementation showed greater benefits than single strain interventions, variations in the concentration of probiotics used and the duration of treatment also influenced the results. Conclusion: Probiotic supplementation could manipulate the gut microbiota by reducing intestinal permeability, inflammation and ameliorate IR and obesity-associated diabetes in animal models which requires further long-term clinical studies in humans.

Keywords

Probiotics; Gut microbiota; Obesity; Insulin resistance; Type 2 Diabetes

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