Preprint Concept Paper Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Introducing a Marine Biorefinery System for the Integrated Production of Biofuels, High-Value-Chemicals and Co-products: A Path Forward to a Sustainable Future

Version 1 : Received: 30 September 2021 / Approved: 1 October 2021 / Online: 1 October 2021 (12:19:47 CEST)

How to cite: Zaky, A.S. Introducing a Marine Biorefinery System for the Integrated Production of Biofuels, High-Value-Chemicals and Co-products: A Path Forward to a Sustainable Future. Preprints 2021, 2021100017 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202110.0017.v1). Zaky, A.S. Introducing a Marine Biorefinery System for the Integrated Production of Biofuels, High-Value-Chemicals and Co-products: A Path Forward to a Sustainable Future. Preprints 2021, 2021100017 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202110.0017.v1).

Abstract

Biofuels have many environmental and practical benefits as a transportation fuel. They are among the best alternatives to fossil fuels due to their capacity for negative carbon emissions, which is vital for archiving the global ambition of a Net-Zero Economy. However, conventional biofuel production takes place on inland sites and relies on freshwater and edible crops (or land suitable for edible crop production), which has led to the food vs fuel debate. It also suffers technical and economical barriers due to the energy balance and the cost of production compared to fossil fuels. Establishing a coastal integrated marine biorefinery (CIMB) system for the simultaneous production of biofuels, high-value chemicals, and other co-products could be the ultimate solution. The proposed system is based on coastal sites and relies on marine resources including seawater, marine biomass (seaweed) and marine microorganisms (marine yeasts and marine microalgae). The system will not require the use of arable land and freshwater in any part of the production chain and will be linked to offshore renewable energy sources to increase its economic and environmental value. This article aims to introduce the CIMB system as a potential vehicle for addressing global warming and speeding the global effort on climate change mitigation as well as increasing global water, food and energy security. I hope this perspective may serve to draw attention into research funding for this approach.

Keywords

Bioenergy; marine fermentation; seawater; marine yeast; microalgae; seaweed; circular economy; high value chemicals

Subject

ENGINEERING, Energy & Fuel Technology

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