Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Incision and Prediction of Risk Factors Related to Surgical Site Infection Following Cesarean Section in Chinese Women

Version 1 : Received: 23 September 2021 / Approved: 24 September 2021 / Online: 24 September 2021 (13:00:37 CEST)

How to cite: Huang, Q. Incision and Prediction of Risk Factors Related to Surgical Site Infection Following Cesarean Section in Chinese Women. Preprints 2021, 2021090436 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202109.0436.v1). Huang, Q. Incision and Prediction of Risk Factors Related to Surgical Site Infection Following Cesarean Section in Chinese Women. Preprints 2021, 2021090436 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202109.0436.v1).

Abstract

Cesarean Section (CS) is one of the most frequently executed surgical procedures in gynecology and obstetrics. After a cesarean section, surgical site infection (SSI) increases hospital stay, lengthens maternal morbidity, and upsurges treatment costs. The current study determines the prevalence and risk factors for surgical site infection following cesarean section in China. A retrospective study was conducted on 23 cases of pregnant women who underwent cesarean section and incision severe infection and detection from March 2017 to January 2020 at Wuhan Maternal and Child Healthcare Hospital in China as the study group, and 20 cases of uninfected cesarean section during the same period were selected as the control group. Data were compared with the controls based on study variables and the presence of SSI. The mean age was 31±2.6. High fever and blood loss were observed in serous SSI-infected patients. The incidence rate of severe surgical site infection was 0.15 %. SSI was observed to be expected in pregnant women who had premature rupture of membrane before surgery (p < 0.001), who underwent postoperative antibiotic therapy (p < 0.001), and the patients who had gestational diabetes mellitus (p <0.001) and hematoma (p < 0.001) during surgery. Hence, following a cesarean section, surgical site infection is common. This research discovered several modifiable risk factors. SSI is associated with multifactorial rather than a single one. The development and strict implementation of a procedure by all health care practitioners can successfully reduce and prevent infection rates following cesarean section.

Keywords

Cesarean Section; surgical site infection; premature rupture of membrane

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