Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Identification of Weed-Suppressive Tomato Cultivars for Weed Management

Version 1 : Received: 1 September 2021 / Approved: 3 September 2021 / Online: 3 September 2021 (10:33:20 CEST)

How to cite: Werle, I.S.; Castro, E.; Pucci, C.; Soni Chakraborty, B.; Broderick, S.R.; Tseng, T.M. Identification of Weed-Suppressive Tomato Cultivars for Weed Management. Preprints 2021, 2021090057 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202109.0057.v1). Werle, I.S.; Castro, E.; Pucci, C.; Soni Chakraborty, B.; Broderick, S.R.; Tseng, T.M. Identification of Weed-Suppressive Tomato Cultivars for Weed Management. Preprints 2021, 2021090057 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202109.0057.v1).

Abstract

The present study aims to identify tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) cultivars with weed-suppressive ability against target weed species in the tomato growing season. A greenhouse study was conducted with 17 tomato cultivars and target weeds Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats), yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.), and large crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis L.). Tomato plants and weed species were grown in the same pot. The height, chlorophyll, and dry weight biomass of the weeds were measured 28 days after sowing. The largest effect of tomato interference was on Palmer amaranth. Cultivar 15 reduced Palmer amaranth height, chlorophyll, and biomass by 58, 28, and 83%, respectively. Chlorophyll percentage of yellow nutsedge seedlings was suppressed by 15% by cultivar 64, whereas 13% of its height was reduced by cultivar 20. Cultivar 15 reduced biomass of yellow nutsedge by 40%. The percentage of chlorophyll of large crabgrass was reduced by 22% with cultivar 5, whereas the height and biomass were reduced by 35 and 44% with cultivars 38 and 63, respectively. Factoring all parameters evaluated, cultivars 38, 33, and 7 were most suppressive against the problematic weed species in tomato.

Keywords

tomato cultivar; allelopathy; competitive ability; plant-plant interactions; weed suppression; sustainable agriculture; weed management; vegetable

Subject

LIFE SCIENCES, Other

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