Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Fine-Scale Urban Heat Patterns in New York City Measured by ASTER Satellite – The Role of Complex Spatial Structures

Version 1 : Received: 18 August 2021 / Approved: 19 August 2021 / Online: 19 August 2021 (10:35:33 CEST)

How to cite: Nath, B.; Ozdogan, M.; Ni-Meister, W. Fine-Scale Urban Heat Patterns in New York City Measured by ASTER Satellite – The Role of Complex Spatial Structures. Preprints 2021, 2021080399 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202108.0399.v1). Nath, B.; Ozdogan, M.; Ni-Meister, W. Fine-Scale Urban Heat Patterns in New York City Measured by ASTER Satellite – The Role of Complex Spatial Structures. Preprints 2021, 2021080399 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202108.0399.v1).

Abstract

Urban areas have very complex spatial structures. These spatial structures are primarily composed of a complex network of built environments, which evolve rapidly as the cities expand to meet the growing population’s demand and economic development. Therefore, studying the impact of spatial structures on urban heat patterns is extremely important for sustainable urban planning and growth. We investigated the relationship between surface temperature obtained by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER, at 90 m spatial resolution) on the current EOS-Terra platform and different urban components based on the classification of high-resolution QuickBird imagery. We further investigated the relationships between surface temperature and building footprint and land use information acquired from the New York City (NYC) Department of City Planning. The ASTER image reveals fine-scale urban heat patterns in the NYC metropolitan region. The dark and medium-dark impervious surfaces, along with bright surfaces, generate higher surface temperatures. Even with highly reflective urban materials, the presence of impervious materials leads to an increased surface temperature. At the same time, trees and shadows are effective in reducing urban heat. The data aggregated to the census tract reveals high-temperature clusters in Queens, Brooklyn, and the Bronx region of NYC. These clusters are associated with industrial and manufacturing areas and multi-family walk-up buildings as dominant land use. The census tracts with more trees and higher building height variability generate lower surface temperatures, consistent with shadow cast by high-rise buildings and trees. The results of this study can be valuable for urban heat island modeling on the effects of building heights variability and tree shadows on small-scale surface temperature patterns. It can also help identify the risk areas during extreme heat events to protect public health.

Keywords

Urban Heat Island; Building Footprint; Remote Sensing; ASTER; New York City

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