Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Nano-Crystallization: An Efficient Technology for Targeting Chemotherapeutic Drugs

Version 1 : Received: 20 July 2021 / Approved: 21 July 2021 / Online: 21 July 2021 (09:40:09 CEST)

How to cite: Iqbal, F.M.; Delie, F. Nano-Crystallization: An Efficient Technology for Targeting Chemotherapeutic Drugs. Preprints 2021, 2021070474 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0474.v1). Iqbal, F.M.; Delie, F. Nano-Crystallization: An Efficient Technology for Targeting Chemotherapeutic Drugs. Preprints 2021, 2021070474 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0474.v1).

Abstract

Presently, nano-crystallization is widely accepted for increasing the solubility and biological barrier permeability of poorly soluble drugs. It improves the bioavailability of therapeutic agents, increasing the effectiveness for treating diseased conditions, and could be safely administered by oral, parenteral, or transdermal routes. Drug nanocrystals are drug particles coated with a thin polymer layer to enhance their stability and could be decorated with ligands for active targeting. In addition, nanocrystals, due to their morphological properties, improve cell internalization. Therefore, passive targeting by high cellular uptake and retention in the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) may be expected. Drug nanocrystals are formulated by either top-down or bottom-up methods and could be scaled up for industrial manufacturing. In the past few decades, nanocrystal formulation has been increasingly studied to overcome the limitations of BCS Class II and IV chemotherapeutic agents. The study of cytotoxic effects of drug formulation on cell lines gives an insight for estimating its in-vivo biodistribution. This review highlights the role of morphology, stabilizer, and ligand conjugation on drug targeting and cellular uptake in cancer cells, as well as a brief discussion on nanocrystal production.

Subject Areas

Nano crystallization; Chemotherapeutic agents; Targeting; Morphology; Stabilizer; Cell lines

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