Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Moral Identity and Subjective Well-being: The Mediating Role of Identity Commitment Quality

Version 1 : Received: 17 July 2021 / Approved: 20 July 2021 / Online: 20 July 2021 (11:52:09 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Cui, P.; Mao, Y.; Shen, Y.; Ma, J. Moral Identity and Subjective Well-Being: The Mediating Role of Identity Commitment Quality. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 9795. Cui, P.; Mao, Y.; Shen, Y.; Ma, J. Moral Identity and Subjective Well-Being: The Mediating Role of Identity Commitment Quality. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 9795.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 9795
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph18189795

Abstract

Moral identity can promote people’s well-being, but existing research has paid little attention to the mechanism of the link between the two. The current study proposed that the eudaimonic identity function is a critical mechanism that links moral identity and well-being. Specifically, the quality of identity commitment mediates the link between subjective well-being and the two dimensions of moral identity, namely, internalization and symbolization. We examined these hypotheses in 419 participants, who completed the Self-importance of Moral Identity Questionnaire, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Scale of Positive and Negative Experience, and Questionnaire for Eudaimonic Well-being. Results from the obtained data confirmed our hypotheses: There is a significant correlation between moral identity and subjective well-being. Both the internalization and symbolization dimensions of moral identity promote subjective well-being through the mediating role of identity commitment quality. We discussed these findings with respect to implications and proposed research suggestions for future studies.

Keywords

moral identity; subjective well-being; identity commitment quality; internalization; symbolization

Subject

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, Applied Psychology

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