Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Adult Human Neurogenesis: Early Studies Clarify Recent Controversies and Go Further

Version 1 : Received: 14 July 2021 / Approved: 20 July 2021 / Online: 20 July 2021 (10:03:05 CEST)

How to cite: Barreto Nogueira, A.; Sayuri Ramires Hoshino, H.; Camargo Ortega, N.; Grazielle Silva dos Santos, B.; Jacobsen Teixeira, M. Adult Human Neurogenesis: Early Studies Clarify Recent Controversies and Go Further. Preprints 2021, 2021070440 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0440.v1). Barreto Nogueira, A.; Sayuri Ramires Hoshino, H.; Camargo Ortega, N.; Grazielle Silva dos Santos, B.; Jacobsen Teixeira, M. Adult Human Neurogenesis: Early Studies Clarify Recent Controversies and Go Further. Preprints 2021, 2021070440 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0440.v1).

Abstract

Evidence on adult mammalian neurogenesis and scarce studies with human brains led to the idea that adult human neurogenesis occurs in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus and in the subventricular zone (SVZ). However, findings published from 2018 rekindled controversies on adult human SGZ neurogenesis. We systematically reviewed studies published during the first decade of characterization of adult human neurogenesis (1994–2004) – when the two-neurogenic-niche concept in humans was consolidated – and compared with further studies. The synthesis of both periods is that adult human neurogenesis occurs in an intensity ranging from practically zero to a level comparable to adult mammalian neurogenesis in general, which is the prevailing conclusion. Nonetheless, Bernier and colleagues showed in 2000 intriguing indications of adult human neurogenesis in a broad area including the limbic system. Likewise, we later showed evidence that limbic and hypothalamic structures surrounding the circumventricular organs form a continuous zone expressing neurogenesis markers encompassing the SGZ and SVZ. The conclusion is that publications from 2018 on adult human neurogenesis did not bring novel findings on location of neurogenic niches. Rather, we expect that the search of neurogenesis beyond the canonical adult mammalian neurogenic niches will confirm our indications that adult human neurogenesis is orchestrated in a broad brain area. We predict that this approach may, for example, clarify that human hippocampal neurogenesis occurs mostly in the CA1-subiculum zone and that the previously identified human rostral migratory stream arising from the SVZ is indeed the column of the fornix expressing neurogenesis markers.

Subject Areas

neural stem cells; hypothalamus; circumventricular organs; limbic system; neuronal plasticity; hippocampus

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