Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Natural-Fibrous Lime-Based Mortar for the Rapid Retrofitting of Masonry Heritage

Version 1 : Received: 19 July 2021 / Approved: 20 July 2021 / Online: 20 July 2021 (09:31:59 CEST)

How to cite: Vailati, M.; Mercuri, M.; Angiolilli, M.; Gregori, A. Natural-Fibrous Lime-Based Mortar for the Rapid Retrofitting of Masonry Heritage. Preprints 2021, 2021070431 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0431.v1). Vailati, M.; Mercuri, M.; Angiolilli, M.; Gregori, A. Natural-Fibrous Lime-Based Mortar for the Rapid Retrofitting of Masonry Heritage. Preprints 2021, 2021070431 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0431.v1).

Abstract

The present work aims to characterize the mechanical behavior of a new composite material for the conservation and development of the vast historical and architectural heritage that is particularly vulnerable to environmental and seismic actions. The new composite consists of natural hydraulic lime (NHL) -based mortar, reinforced by sisal short fibers randomly oriented in the mortar matrix. The NHL-based mortar ensures the chemical-physical compatibility with the original feature of the historical masonry structures (mostly in stone and clay) aiming to pursue both the effectiveness and durability of the intervention. The use of vegetable fibers (i.e. the sisal one) is an exciting challenge for the construction industry since they require a lower degree of industrialization for their processing, and therefore, their costs are also low, as compared to the most common synthetic/metal fibers. Beams of sisal-composite sizing 160x40x40 mm3 with a central notch are tested in three-point bending, aiming to evaluate both their bending strength and fracture energy. Also, tensile tests and compressive tests were performed on the composite samples, while water retention test and slump test were performed on the fresh mix. Finally, the tensile tests on the Sisal strand were carried out to evaluate the tensile strength of both strand and wire. A final comparison with unreinforced mortar specimens shows that the proposed composite ensures great workability and good performances in term of ductility and strength and it can be considered a promising alternative to the classic fiber-reinforcing systems.

Subject Areas

masonry; composite; short fibers; natural hydraulic lime; sisal; three-point bending test; fracture energy; strengthening; preservation; sustainability; carbon foot print

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