Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Prospects of 3D Bioprinting as a Possible Treatment for Cancer Cachexia

Version 1 : Received: 12 July 2021 / Approved: 14 July 2021 / Online: 14 July 2021 (11:20:17 CEST)

How to cite: Galib, M.; Araf, Y.; Naser, I.B.; Promon, S.K. Prospects of 3D Bioprinting as a Possible Treatment for Cancer Cachexia. Preprints 2021, 2021070321 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0321.v1). Galib, M.; Araf, Y.; Naser, I.B.; Promon, S.K. Prospects of 3D Bioprinting as a Possible Treatment for Cancer Cachexia. Preprints 2021, 2021070321 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0321.v1).

Abstract

Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome that is identified by ongoing muscle atrophy, along with functional impairment, anorexia, weakness, fatigue, anemia, reduced tolerance to antitumor treatments. Thus, reducing the patients’ quality of life. Cachexia alone causes about 22-25% of cancer deaths. This review covers the symptoms, mediators, available treatment, and prospects of 3D bioprinting for cancer cachexia. Studies about cachexia have shown several factors that drive this disease – protein breakdown, inflammatory cytokines activation, and mitochondrial alteration. Even with proper nutrition, physical exercises, anti-inflammatory agents, chemotherapy, and grafting attempts, standard treatment has been unsuccessful for cachexia. But the use of 3D bioprinting shows much promise compared to conventional methods by attempting to fabricate 3D constructs mimicking the native muscle tissues. In this review, some 3D bioprinting techniques with their advantages and drawbacks, along with their achievements and challenges in in-vivo applications have been discussed. Constructs with neural integration or muscle-tendon units aim to repair muscle atrophy. But it is still difficult to properly bio-print these complex muscles. Although progress can be made by developing new bio-inks or 3D printers to fabricate high-resolution constructs. Using secondary data, this review study shows prospects of why 3D bioprinting can be a good alternate approach to fight cachexia.

Subject Areas

Cancer cachexia, muscle atrophy, tissue regeneration, 3D bioprinting

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