Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Neural Correlates of Aberrant Salience and Source Monitoring in Schizophrenia and at-Risk Mental States - A Systematic Review of fMRI Studies

Version 1 : Received: 6 July 2021 / Approved: 7 July 2021 / Online: 7 July 2021 (13:05:30 CEST)

How to cite: Kowalski, J.; Aleksandrowicz, A.; Dąbkowska, M.; Gawęda, Ł. Neural Correlates of Aberrant Salience and Source Monitoring in Schizophrenia and at-Risk Mental States - A Systematic Review of fMRI Studies. Preprints 2021, 2021070180 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0180.v1). Kowalski, J.; Aleksandrowicz, A.; Dąbkowska, M.; Gawęda, Ł. Neural Correlates of Aberrant Salience and Source Monitoring in Schizophrenia and at-Risk Mental States - A Systematic Review of fMRI Studies. Preprints 2021, 2021070180 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0180.v1).

Abstract

Cognitive biases are an important factor contributing to the development and symptom severity of psychosis. Despite that various cognitive biases are contributing to psychosis, they are rarely investigated together. In the current systematic review, we aimed at investigating specific and shared neural correlates of two important cognitive biases: aberrant salience and source monitoring. We conducted a systematic search of fMRI studies of said cognitive biases. Eight studies on aberrant salience and eleven studies on source monitoring were included in the review. We critically discussed behavioural and neuroimaging findings concerning cognitive biases. Various brain regions are associated with aberrant salience and source monitoring in individuals with schizophrenia and the risk of psychosis. Ventral striatum and insula contribute to aberrant salience. The medial prefrontal cortex, superior and middle temporal gyrus contribute to source monitoring. The anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus contribute to both cognitive biases, constituting a neural overlap. Our review indicates that aberrant salience and source monitoring may share neural mechanisms, suggesting their joint role in producing disrupted external attributions of perceptual and cognitive experiences, thus elucidating their role in positive symptoms of psychosis. Account bridging mechanisms of these two biases is discussed. Further studies are warranted.

Subject Areas

aberrant salience; source monitoring; psychosis; cognitive biases; self-disturbance; neuroimagining; fMRI

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