Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Epigenetics: A Key to Comprehending Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Family Poaceae

Version 1 : Received: 5 July 2021 / Approved: 6 July 2021 / Online: 6 July 2021 (11:32:11 CEST)

How to cite: Priyanka, V.; Goel, N.; Dhaliwal, I.; Sharma, M.; Kumar, R.; Kaushik, P. Epigenetics: A Key to Comprehending Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Family Poaceae. Preprints 2021, 2021070135 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0135.v1). Priyanka, V.; Goel, N.; Dhaliwal, I.; Sharma, M.; Kumar, R.; Kaushik, P. Epigenetics: A Key to Comprehending Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Family Poaceae. Preprints 2021, 2021070135 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0135.v1).

Abstract

Climate change has had a significant impact on many ecosystems worldwide, prompting native population species to adapt to the current weather patterns eventually. Pre-existing genetic variation in populations explains part of this adaptation. Still, recent studies have shown that new stable phenotypes can be generated through epigenetic modifications in just a few generations, thereby contributing to the stability and survival of plants in their natural habitat as they eventually adjust to the surrounding impacts. The state of chromatin inside plant cells varies, allowing cells to fine-tune their transcriptional profiles to better adapt to stimuli from the external environment. Within a cell, chromatin state changes such as post-transcriptional histone modifications and variations, DNA methylation, and non-coding RNA activity are all examples of chromatin state alterations that may epigenetically dictate certain transcriptional outputs. Recent advances in the field of ‘Omics’ in major crops has made it easier to identify epigenetic changes and their impact on plant responses to environmental stresses. These epigenetic mechanisms thus play an important role in improving crop adaptation and resilience to changing environments. This variation that has emerged can thus be exploited in crop breeding, ultimately leading to the generation of stable climate-resilient genotypes.

Subject Areas

epigenetics; epigenetic variation; chromatin changes; omics; climate-resilient crops

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