Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Features of Retinal Neurogenesis as a Key Factor of Age-Related Neurodegeneration: Myth or Reality?

Version 1 : Received: 28 June 2021 / Approved: 29 June 2021 / Online: 29 June 2021 (12:41:56 CEST)

How to cite: Telegina, D.; Kozhevnikova, O.; Antonenko, A.; Kolosova, N. Features of Retinal Neurogenesis as a Key Factor of Age-Related Neurodegeneration: Myth or Reality?. Preprints 2021, 2021060701 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0701.v1). Telegina, D.; Kozhevnikova, O.; Antonenko, A.; Kolosova, N. Features of Retinal Neurogenesis as a Key Factor of Age-Related Neurodegeneration: Myth or Reality?. Preprints 2021, 2021060701 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0701.v1).

Abstract

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex, multifactorial neurodegenerative disease that constitutes the most common cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly in developed countries. Incomplete knowledge about its pathogenesis prevents the search for effective methods of prevention and treatment of AMD, primarily its “dry” type, which is by far the most common (90% of all AMD cases). In recent years, AMD became younger: late stages of the disease are now detected in relatively young people. It is known that AMD pathogenesis—according to the age-related structural and functional changes in the retina—is linked with inflammation, hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and an impairment of neurotrophic support, but the mechanisms that trigger the conversion of normal age-related changes to the pathological process as well as the reason for early AMD development remain unclear. In the adult mammalian retina, de novo neurogenesis is very limited. Therefore, the structural and functional features that arise during its maturation and formation can exert long-term effects on further ontogenesis of this tissue. The aim of this review is to discuss possible contributions of the changes/disturbances in retinal neurogenesis to the early development of AMD.

Subject Areas

retina; neurodegeneration; AMD; aging; neurogenesis; development; transcription factor

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