Working Paper Article Version 2 This version is not peer-reviewed

Percieved trust in Public Authorities Nine Months after the COVID-19 Outbreak: A Cross-National Study

Version 1 : Received: 15 June 2021 / Approved: 18 June 2021 / Online: 18 June 2021 (08:09:01 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 9 October 2021 / Approved: 11 October 2021 / Online: 11 October 2021 (11:04:14 CEST)

How to cite: Price, D.; Bonsaksen, T.; Ruffolo, M.; Leung, J.; Chiu, V.; Thygesen, H.; Schoultz, M.; Geirdal, A.O. Percieved trust in Public Authorities Nine Months after the COVID-19 Outbreak: A Cross-National Study. Preprints 2021, 2021060469 Price, D.; Bonsaksen, T.; Ruffolo, M.; Leung, J.; Chiu, V.; Thygesen, H.; Schoultz, M.; Geirdal, A.O. Percieved trust in Public Authorities Nine Months after the COVID-19 Outbreak: A Cross-National Study. Preprints 2021, 2021060469

Abstract

This study aimed to examine trust in information provided by public authorities and financial measures put in place to address the impact of COVID-19. Using a cross-national approach among four Western countries; the United States of America, Norway, Australia, and the United Kingdom provides an analysis of responses related to trust and how they were associated with age group, gender, education level, employment status, size of place of residence, infection sta-tus, and social media use. When controlling for all included variables in logistic regression analyses, the likelihood of having trust in the public authorities’ information was higher for women, those with higher levels of education, and those living in urban areas. Being infected with the coronavirus, and spending more time daily on social media was associated with lower likelihood reporting trust in information. Although policies implemented to respond to eco-nomic concerns varied cross-nationally, higher age, identifying as female, being employed, liv-ing in a city, and lower levels of social media usage were associated with higher likelihood of trusting in the financial measures put in place to counteract the economic effects of COVID-19.

Keywords

coronavirus; cross-national study; pandemic; public authorities; social media; trust

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 11 October 2021
Commenter: Daicia Price
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: Title revised and minor revisions in text.
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