Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Diversity of Adult Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells in Physiology and Disease

Version 1 : Received: 15 June 2021 / Approved: 16 June 2021 / Online: 16 June 2021 (15:02:02 CEST)

How to cite: Finkel, Z.; ESTEBAN, F.; Rodriguez, B.; FU, T.; Ai, X.; Cai, L. Diversity of Adult Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells in Physiology and Disease. Preprints 2021, 2021060449 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0449.v1). Finkel, Z.; ESTEBAN, F.; Rodriguez, B.; FU, T.; Ai, X.; Cai, L. Diversity of Adult Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells in Physiology and Disease. Preprints 2021, 2021060449 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0449.v1).

Abstract

Adult neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs) contribute to learning, memory, maintenance of homeostasis, energy metabolism and many other essential processes. They are highly heterogeneous populations that require input from a regionally distinct microenvironment including a mix of neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, ependymal cells, NG2+ glia, vasculature, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and others. The diversity of NSPCs is present in all three major parts of the CNS, i.e., the brain, spinal cord, and retina. Intrinsic and extrinsic signals, e.g., neurotrophic and growth factors, master transcription factors, and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), collectively regulate activities and characteristics of NSPCs: quiescence/survival, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and integration. This review discusses the heterogeneous NSPC populations in the normal physiology and highlights their potentials and roles in injured/diseased states for regenerative medicine.

Subject Areas

Central Nervous System; Ependymal Cells; Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells; NG2+ Cells; Regenerative Medicine; Retina Injury; Spinal Cord Injury; Traumatic Brain Injury.

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 26 June 2021
Commenter: Daniel Garcia Ovejero
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: Dear authors,
you cite our work in reference 38, but in your citation you state the opposite to what we show in our paper. Just the opposite.
You state:
"In normal physiology, NSPC proliferation is observed in this stem cell niche, indicated by Ki67 antibody staining in numerous studies [38,39]."
The title of our paper:
"Cells in the adult human spinal cord ependymal region do not proliferate after injury"
J Pathol. 2018 Dec;246(4):415-421. doi: 10.1002/path.5151. Epub 2018 Oct 30.
Inside the paper it is even more clear why we say that
You should correct the citation, in my opinion
Best
Daniel
+ Respond to this comment

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 1
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.