Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

A Forecast Visual Observation of the Anthropogenic Impact on the Pilgrimage Places Along the Southeast Coast of Tamil Nadu, India

Version 1 : Received: 11 June 2021 / Approved: 15 June 2021 / Online: 15 June 2021 (12:06:16 CEST)

How to cite: Viji, R.; Shrinithivihahshini, N.D.; Armstrong-Altrin, J.S.; Eid, E.M. A Forecast Visual Observation of the Anthropogenic Impact on the Pilgrimage Places Along the Southeast Coast of Tamil Nadu, India. Preprints 2021, 2021060404 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0404.v1). Viji, R.; Shrinithivihahshini, N.D.; Armstrong-Altrin, J.S.; Eid, E.M. A Forecast Visual Observation of the Anthropogenic Impact on the Pilgrimage Places Along the Southeast Coast of Tamil Nadu, India. Preprints 2021, 2021060404 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0404.v1).

Abstract

The present investigation is focused on the forecasting visual observation of the impact of anthropogenic activity on the pilgrimage places located along the coastal environments in Tamil Nadu, India. Devotees performing the unregulated ritual ceremonies, open defecation, waste materials dumping and local municipality discharging wastewater contamination levels were assessed from direct visual surveillance, and by taking photographs and baseline information collected from five different pilgrimage sites. Results showed that ritual ceremonies, wastewater discharges and debris highly contaminated site-III, and found open defecation at site-I. The lack of coastal regulation, pollution awareness, insufficient sanitation facilities and failure to control the commercial and recreational activities have major deleterious effects on the present and future environments of the coastal areas. This is the first attempt conducted by visual assessment of the coastal pollution in pilgrimage places. The results immensely support the recommendation for proper regulation of ritual activities, arrangement of basic sanitation facilities and prohibition of wastewater discharges to prevent waterborne diseases as well as to strictly follow the regional and national level of coastal regulation policy to protect the biological resources of the Gulf of Mannar marine ecosystems.

Subject Areas

Shoreline holy places, unregulated ritual impact, Wastewater and Open-defecation, Physiochemical and Microbial pollution, Gulf of Mannar

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