Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Concentrated Raw Fibers Enhance the Fiber-Degrading Capacity of a Synthetic Human Gut Microbiome

Version 1 : Received: 11 June 2021 / Approved: 14 June 2021 / Online: 14 June 2021 (09:19:54 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Steimle, A.; Neumann, M.; Grant, E.T.; Turner, J.D.; Desai, M.S. Concentrated Raw Fibers Enhance the Fiber-Degrading Capacity of a Synthetic Human Gut Microbiome. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 6855. Steimle, A.; Neumann, M.; Grant, E.T.; Turner, J.D.; Desai, M.S. Concentrated Raw Fibers Enhance the Fiber-Degrading Capacity of a Synthetic Human Gut Microbiome. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 6855.

Journal reference: Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 6855
DOI: 10.3390/ijms22136855

Abstract

Consumption of prebiotic fibers to modulate the human gut microbiome is a promising strategy to positively impact health. Nevertheless, given the compositional complexity of the microbiome and its inter-individual variances, generalized recommendations on the source or amount of fiber supplements remain vague. This problem is further compounded by availability of tractable in vitro and in vivo models to validate certain fibers. We employed a gnotobiotic mouse model containing an a priori characterized 14-member synthetic human gut microbiome (SM) for their ability to metabolize a suit of fibers in vitro; the SM contains 14 different strains belonging to five distinct phyla. Since soluble purified fibers have been a common subject of studies, we specifically investigated the effects of concentrated raw fibers (CRFs)—containing fibers from pea, oat, psyllium, wheat and apple—on the compositional and functional alterations in the SM. We demonstrate that, compared to a fiber-free diet, CRF supplementation increased the abundance of fiber-degraders namely Eubacterium rectale, Roseburia intestinalis and Bacteroides ovatus and decreased the abundance of the mucin-degrader Akkermansia muciniphila. These results were corroborated by a general increase of bacterial fiber-degrading α-glucosidase enzyme activity. Overall, our results highlight the ability of CRFs to enhance the microbial fiber-degrading capacity.

Subject Areas

microbiota; microbiome; manipulation; fiber; diet; prebiotic; nutrition; supplement

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