Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Carbon Lock-in and Contradictions – Teaching Mexico’s Energy Transition

Version 1 : Received: 8 June 2021 / Approved: 10 June 2021 / Online: 10 June 2021 (09:37:36 CEST)

How to cite: Hernandez, A.M.; Pacheco Rojas, D.A.; Barrón Villaverde, D. Carbon Lock-in and Contradictions – Teaching Mexico’s Energy Transition. Preprints 2021, 2021060286 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0286.v1). Hernandez, A.M.; Pacheco Rojas, D.A.; Barrón Villaverde, D. Carbon Lock-in and Contradictions – Teaching Mexico’s Energy Transition. Preprints 2021, 2021060286 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0286.v1).

Abstract

The energy sector plays an important role in Mexico’s development trajectory. Mexico makes an interesting case study, because it shows how difficult it is to reduce fossil energy dependence despite geographic and climatic conditions that favour renewable energy deployment and use. Resolving path dependencies and the related carbon lock-in are key to Mexico’s sustainable energy transition. This case study aims to identify and discuss how carbon lock-in affects Mexico’s sustainable energy transition. Mexico’s carbon lock-in involves oil and oil-run power plants that are costly to build but relatively inexpensive to operate. This case study identifies potential entry points for transitioning towards sustainable energy in Mexico – resources that can promote the use of clean energy despite carbon lock-in. For example, focusing on electrification – particularly of the carbon-intensive sectors – can help Mexico transit towards sustainable energy despite institutional constraints. Complementing this case study is a teaching guide with recommendations for using Mexico’s energy transition in courses on sustainability. It introduces a “learning activation framework” to identify emerging opportunities that can advance sustainable energy transitions in different cases of carbon lock-in. Finally, the framework also gives students a chance to help dismantle or cope with carbon lock-ins.

Subject Areas

sustainable energy; renewable energies; energy transitions; transformation to sustainability; policy analysis; grass-root movements; indigenous communities

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