Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Effects of Traditional and Modern Post-Harvest Withering Processes on the Composition of the Vitis v. Corvina Grape and the Sensory Profile of Amarone Wines

Version 1 : Received: 8 June 2021 / Approved: 9 June 2021 / Online: 9 June 2021 (09:03:25 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Tomasi, D.; Lonardi, A.; Boscaro, D.; Nardi, T.; Marangon, C.M.; De Rosso, M.; Flamini, R.; Lovat, L.; Mian, G. Effects of Traditional and Modern Post-Harvest Withering Processes on the Composition of the Vitis v. Corvina Grape and the Sensory Profile of Amarone Wines. Molecules 2021, 26, 5198. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26175198 Tomasi, D.; Lonardi, A.; Boscaro, D.; Nardi, T.; Marangon, C.M.; De Rosso, M.; Flamini, R.; Lovat, L.; Mian, G. Effects of Traditional and Modern Post-Harvest Withering Processes on the Composition of the Vitis v. Corvina Grape and the Sensory Profile of Amarone Wines. Molecules 2021, 26, 5198. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26175198

Journal reference: Molecules 2021
DOI: 10.3390/molecules26175198

Abstract

In the Valpolicella area (Verona - Italy) Vitis vinifera cv. Corvina is the main grape variety used to produce Amarone wine. Before starting the winemaking process, the Corvina grapes are stored in a withering (i.e., dehydrating) warehouse until about 30% of the berry weight is lost (WL). This practice is followed to have the chemical metabolites concentrate in the berry and enrich the Amarone wine in aroma and antioxidant compounds. In compliance with the guidelines and strict Amarone protocol set by the Consorzio of Amarone-Valpolicella, withering must be carried out by setting the grapes in a suitable environment, either under controlled relative air humidity (RH) conditions and wind speed (WS) – no temperature modification is to be applied – or, following the traditional methods, in open-air natural environmental conditions. In general, the two processes have different dehydration kinetics due to the different conditions in terms of temperature, RH, and WS, which affect the accumulation of sugars and organic acids and the biosynthesis of sec-ondary metabolites such as stilbenes and glycoside aroma precursors. For this study, the two grape-withering processes were carried out under controlled (C) and not-controlled (NC) condi-tions and the final compositions of the Corvina dried grapes were compared also to evaluate the effects on the organoleptic characteristics of Amarone wine. The findings highlighted differences between the two processes mainly in terms of the secondary metabolites of the dried grapes, which affect the organoleptic characteristics of Amarone wine.

Keywords

post-harvest; grape; wine; withering; stilbenes; aroma; Amarone; Corvina

Subject

CHEMISTRY, Food Chemistry

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 26 September 2021
Commenter: Barry Simon
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: These articles are excellent source of information. Can all grape varieties be dried and have the same impact as on the Corvina grapes? Do we understand the initial sugar value at harvest, Brix levels before drying? From what I understand, the Amarone wine goes for about 4 months drying to increase the sugars but yet they can produce a dry wine at 14-16% ABV. Do they dilute these wines to achieve this? I tried drying Cab Saw grapes for an experiment with the original Brix at 23-24. in 4 geeks the Brix was 42 degrease making this sweet wine where most of the sugars are not converted. Corvina grapes must be at a lower Brix levels and with their thick skins, frying periods of 4 months takes them that long to reduce it's moisture by 30%

Looking for your thoughts on the initial sugar levels on the Corvina grapes. Great website and thank you
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