Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Face Biometrics as a Potential Predictor for COVID-19 Susceptibility

Version 1 : Received: 3 June 2021 / Approved: 7 June 2021 / Online: 7 June 2021 (08:29:46 CEST)

How to cite: Kit, O. Face Biometrics as a Potential Predictor for COVID-19 Susceptibility. Preprints 2021, 2021060152 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0152.v1). Kit, O. Face Biometrics as a Potential Predictor for COVID-19 Susceptibility. Preprints 2021, 2021060152 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0152.v1).

Abstract

Fighting against the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus is one of the most critical challenges facing the global health system today. The possibility to identify the group of persons in the cohort of people under 50 years old, who are sensitive to the COVID-disease by non-invasive methods, is a very perspective approach for estimating the epidemiological state of the human population. The study aimed to identify the features of people's faces with COVID-19 that the most correlate with disease severity could serve as one of these approaches. For this aim, 525 photos of patients' faces with different outcomes of COVID-19 disease were analyzed using the Dlib face recognition convolutional neural network pre-trained for face recognition. Face descriptor vectors were obtained using the convolutional neural network. Facial features were found that predict a person's sensitivity to the SARS-CoV-2 virus (disease severity), and the contribution of each of the features to the risk of developing a severe form of COVID in a person was found. The accuracy of the binary classification of the individual severity of the COVID-19 course using the k-nearest neighbors algorithm on the test dataset was accuracy - 84%, AUC - 0.90.

Keywords

COVID-19; face recognition

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