Preprint Case Report Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Neural Timing Deficits Prevalent in Developmental Disorders, Aging, and Concussions Remediated Rapidly By Movement Discrimination Exercises

Version 1 : Received: 26 May 2021 / Approved: 27 May 2021 / Online: 27 May 2021 (08:09:31 CEST)

How to cite: Lawton, T.; Shelley-Tremblay, J.; Huang, M. Neural Timing Deficits Prevalent in Developmental Disorders, Aging, and Concussions Remediated Rapidly By Movement Discrimination Exercises. Preprints 2021, 2021050659 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0659.v1). Lawton, T.; Shelley-Tremblay, J.; Huang, M. Neural Timing Deficits Prevalent in Developmental Disorders, Aging, and Concussions Remediated Rapidly By Movement Discrimination Exercises. Preprints 2021, 2021050659 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0659.v1).

Abstract

(1) Background: Substantial evidence that neural timing deficits are prevalent in developmental disorders, aging, and concussions resulting from a mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) is presented. We show that if timing deficits are remediated using low-level movement discrimination training, then high-level cognitive skills, including reading, attention, processing speed, and working memory improve substantially. (2) Methods: Two case studies are presented using MEG source imaging on an adult dyslexic, and a healthy older adult observed before and after training on movement discrimination two times/week for 8 weeks for adult dyslexic. (3) Results: We found improvements in reading, attention, processing speed, and working memory on neuropsychological tests. Substantial MEG signal increases in visual Motion Networks (V1, V3, MT, MST), Attention Networks (ACC, dlPFC, vlPFC and precuneous/ PCC areas) and Memory Networks (dlPFC). (4) Conclusions: Improving neural timing deficits before cognitive exercises to improve specific cognitive skills provides a rapid and effective method to improve cognitive skills. Improving the timing and sensitivity of low-level dorsal pathways, improving feedforward and feedback pathways, is essential to improve high-level cognitive skills. This adaptive training with substantial feedback shows cognitive transfer to tasks not trained on, significantly improving a person’s quality of life rapidly and effectively.

Subject Areas

Timing Deficits; Magnocellular Deficits; Remediating Cognitive Skills; Cortical Plasticity; Reading, Attention, Memory, and Executive Control Networks; Perceptual Learning

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