Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Evolution of a Late Miocene Deep-water Depositional System in the Southern Taranaki Basin, New Zealand

Version 1 : Received: 11 May 2021 / Approved: 13 May 2021 / Online: 13 May 2021 (13:50:48 CEST)

How to cite: Silver, C.; Bedle, H. Evolution of a Late Miocene Deep-water Depositional System in the Southern Taranaki Basin, New Zealand. Preprints 2021, 2021050300 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0300.v1). Silver, C.; Bedle, H. Evolution of a Late Miocene Deep-water Depositional System in the Southern Taranaki Basin, New Zealand. Preprints 2021, 2021050300 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0300.v1).

Abstract

A long-standing problem in the understanding of deep-water turbidite reservoirs relates to how the three-dimensional evolution of deep-water channel systems evolve in response to channel filling on spatio-temporal scales, and how depositional environments affect channel architecture. The 3-D structure and temporal evolution of late Miocene deep-water channel complexes in the southern Taranaki Basin, New Zealand is investigated, and the geometry, distribution and stacking patterns of the channel complexes are analyzed. Two recently acquired 3-D seismic datasets, the Pipeline-3D (proximal) and Hector-3D (distal) are analyzed. These surveys provide detailed imaging of late Miocene deep-water channel systems, allowing for the assessment of the intricate geometry and seismic geomorphology of the systems. Seismic attributes resolve the channel bodies and the associated architectural elements. Spectral decomposition, amplitude curvature, and coherence attributes reveal NW-trending straight to low-sinuosity channels and less prominent NE-trending high-sinuosity feeder channels. Stratal slices across the seismic datasets better characterize the architectural elements. The mapped turbidite systems transition from low-sinuosity to meandering high-sinuosity patterns, likely caused by a change in the shelf-slope gradient due to localized structural relief. Stacking facies patterns within the channel systems reveal the temporal variation from a depositional environment characterized by sediment bypass to vertically aggrading channel systems.

Subject Areas

seismic analysis; attributes; deepwater channels; paleochannels; Miocene

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