Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Self-Organized Structuring of Recurrent Neuronal Networks for Reliable Information Transmission

Version 1 : Received: 7 May 2021 / Approved: 10 May 2021 / Online: 10 May 2021 (14:06:22 CEST)

How to cite: Miner, D.; Wörgötter, F.; Tetzlaff, C.; Fauth, M. Self-Organized Structuring of Recurrent Neuronal Networks for Reliable Information Transmission. Preprints 2021, 2021050196 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0196.v1). Miner, D.; Wörgötter, F.; Tetzlaff, C.; Fauth, M. Self-Organized Structuring of Recurrent Neuronal Networks for Reliable Information Transmission. Preprints 2021, 2021050196 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202105.0196.v1).

Abstract

Our brains process information using a layered hierarchical network architecture, with abundant connections within each layer and sparse long-range connections between layers. As these long-range connections are mostly unchanged after development, each layer has to locally self-organize in response to new inputs to enable information routing between the sparse in- and output connections. Here we demonstrate that this can be achieved by a well-established model of cortical self-organization based on a well-orchestrated interplay between several plasticity processes. After this self-organization, stimuli conveyed by sparse inputs can be rapidly read out from a layer using only very few long-range connections. To achieve this information routing, the neurons that are stimulated form feed-forward projections into the unstimulated parts of the same layer and get more neurons to represent the stimulus. Hereby, the plasticity processes ensure that each neuron only receives projections from and responds to only one stimulus such that the network is partitioned into parts with different preferred stimuli. Along this line, we show that the relation between the network activity and connectivity self-organizes to a biologically plausible regime. Finally, we argue how the emerging connectivity may minimize the metabolic cost for maintaining a network structure under the above described constraints.

Subject Areas

self-organization; synaptic plasticity; information transfer

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.